Living History – Suffolk BRC http://suffolkbrc.org.uk/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 10:16:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/default-150x150.png Living History – Suffolk BRC http://suffolkbrc.org.uk/ 32 32 History comes to life at the Exchange Place Fall Festival | Community https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/history-comes-to-life-at-the-exchange-place-fall-festival-community/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 09:30:00 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/history-comes-to-life-at-the-exchange-place-fall-festival-community/ After being canceled last year due to COVID-19, the Fall Folk Arts Festival returns to Exchange Place on Saturday and Sunday, with live demonstrations of 19th century crafts. Contributed photo Marshal Adesman | Exchange place Exchange Place Living History Farm will kick off the fall by hosting the 49th annual Fall Folk Arts Festival. Following […]]]>





After being canceled last year due to COVID-19, the Fall Folk Arts Festival returns to Exchange Place on Saturday and Sunday, with live demonstrations of 19th century crafts.


Contributed photo


Marshal Adesman | Exchange place

Exchange Place Living History Farm will kick off the fall by hosting the 49th annual Fall Folk Arts Festival. Following the cancellation of last year’s event due to COVID-19, this harvest season celebration will take place on Saturday, September 25 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, September 26 from noon to 5 p.m. Admission is $ 5, and children under 12 are admitted free.

With major support from Hamlett-Dobson Funeral Homes, all proceeds will go towards the care of farm animals and the ongoing restoration and preservation of the site, located at 4812 Orebank Road in Kingsport, Tennessee. And this year, because the virus remains present in the region, all CDC protocols will be followed, including closing historic buildings. Visitors are strongly advised to wear masks and to maintain a safe distance from others.

Artists from across the region will come together to showcase 19th-century craftsmanship, as well as sell a wide range of traditional folk arts and craft arts of today. Plants for fall planting will also be available, along with dried flowers, seasonal crafts, local honey, goat’s milk cheeses, salsas and hot sauces, and ground cornmeal. on stone, oatmeal and more.

In addition, several renowned heritage artists will be on the ground during the weekend. Longtime Southern Highland Craft Guild member George McCollum will be making his very famous White Oak miniature baskets (Saturday only). Master Craftsman Heather Ashworth of the Arrowmont School of the Arts in Gatlinburg will be offering two traditional broom making workshops on Sunday at noon and again at 2:30 pm Students will tie two hand brooms using hand corn. broom and colorful rope. The cost for this one-time workshop is $ 65 and includes all materials. Registration is required by Sunday September 19 at heather4trees@gmail.com. (Please note that classes will only take place if at least five people register.)


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Dena Denkler Ryan has witnessed changes in 92 years of living on ‘the avenue’ | Story https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/dena-denkler-ryan-has-witnessed-changes-in-92-years-of-living-on-the-avenue-story/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 05:15:00 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/dena-denkler-ryan-has-witnessed-changes-in-92-years-of-living-on-the-avenue-story/ Dena Denkler Ryan closed her eyes in a last sleep on August 27, 1961, at the age of 92, in the same house at 606 Mark Twain Avenue where she had lived for about six decades. Outside her windows, the avenue was undergoing changes as she probably never could have imagined: as construction crews cleared […]]]>

Dena Denkler Ryan closed her eyes in a last sleep on August 27, 1961, at the age of 92, in the same house at 606 Mark Twain Avenue where she had lived for about six decades.

Outside her windows, the avenue was undergoing changes as she probably never could have imagined: as construction crews cleared the avenue to widen it to road standards, the buildings central to her education were demolished. . There was the move, stone by stone, of the house where she spent the first years of her marriage. There was the closure of North Fourth Street where it previously crossed the avenue. The construction of a viaduct extended Fifth Street to Mark Twain Avenue, forcing the relocation of several of its neighbors.

But inside her house, she was surrounded by her family, as she had been throughout her long life. Most of her generation predated her, but her descendants were numerous and filled her house.

The first years

Palmyra Avenue (later renamed Mark Twain Avenue / US 36) was Hannibal’s first commercial district, serving Mississippi travelers traveling by stagecoach to all points west.

Mitchell and Remington ran a foundry on Palmyra Avenue in 1851.

Jacob Coffman made coffins in his shop located in the Robard Annex on the south side of the avenue in 1852.

Thomas Jackson operated a grocery store in the Stone Building on the south side of the avenue in 1854.

In 1855, Jacob R. Harris offered for sale his new frame dwelling on the north side of Palmyra Avenue, across from Garth’s Tobacco Stemmery, which was located at Fourth and Palmyra Avenue.

And in 1856, Garth’s Tobacco Stemmery burned to the ground, before being later rebuilt with brick.

1869

By the time Bernard Denkler opened a grocery store on Palmyre Avenue in 1869, the avenue itself was well established as a business district.

Purchasing a frame building owned by a man named Clayman, Denkler immediately embarked on opening a grocery store that would serve the needs of his neighborhood for five decades.

The frame building was replaced in 1881 by a two-story brick building, which served as both a business and a home for the elderly Denklers and their extended family for many years to come.

The same year Bernard Denkler opened the grocery store, his wife, Anna Feldkamp Denkler, gave birth to a daughter, also named Anna. The child joined four other siblings, William, John, Henry and Mary.

Young Anna would indeed live her whole life on the avenue.

Wedding

Redmond Ryan, a concrete contractor, grew up in Ralls County, near Oakwood, on a small area adjacent to New London’s Gravel Road. His family, who were market gardeners, raised produce on their approximately 14 acres, selling their harvest to townspeople and traders.

After winning the heart and hand of Dena Denkler in 1895, the two set up housekeeping in the stone building adjacent to her father’s store. This building was aligned with the southeast corner of Denkler’s Alley, facing Palmyra Avenue.

Within a few years, Redmond Ryan began building a two-story house across the street and a little west of the Denkler grocery store. In 1897, Redmond and Dena were living in this expansive two-story brick and stone house. Their first child, Joseph Ryan, was born in 1898.

Stone house

One of Hannibal’s most recognizable structures is located at the intersection of North Third and Mark Twain Avenue. The rectangular, stone-built building is owned by the city and today houses Jim’s Journey, the Huck Finn Freedom Center.

Although the building is historic in nature, this is not the original location of the stone building.

It once stood at the southeast intersection of Denkler’s Alley and Mark Twain Avenue, and in August 1956 it was moved – stone by stone – to facilitate the widening of Mark Twain Avenue.

The move was accomplished by the New Marion County Historical Society. The main leaders of the project included Kate Ray Kuhn, Charles Walker and Ms. Frank Berry.

It is calculated that this is the same stone house where the Ryan’s began their married life together in 1895.

It is also believed to be the location of the aforementioned grocery store operated by Thomas Jackson in 1854.

Ryan family

Redmond and Anna Denkler Ryan had four children to adulthood:

• Joseph, born circa 1898; he married Nora Flannagan of Hannibal in 1921. He died in 1967.

• Helen Ryan, born in 1900, married Michael Joseph O’Hearn. Their children are: Mary O’Hearn, Mike O’Hearn, Richard O’Hearn, Helen Ann O’Hearn, James O’Hearn, Kenneth O’Hearn, David O’Hearn, Eleanor O’Hearn and Eugene O’Hearn. Helen O’Hearn and her children lived with her mother, Mrs. Ryan, after the death of Michael O’Hearn in 1939. Helen Ryan O’Hearn died in 1994 at the age of approximately 93.

• Viola Ryan, born in 1902, married Ralph W. Church. Their children are: Mary F. Church and Francis (Xavier) Church. In 1940, the Church family also lived at 606 Mark Twain Avenue. Mrs. Church died in 1991, at the approximate age of 89.

• Redmond Ryan Jr., born 1908. He married Leola Remshardt in 1941. He died January 24, 1958 in St. Charles, Missouri.

Funeral

Ms. Ryan’s funeral was held at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Hannibal. His grandson, the Rev. Wenceslaus Church OFM, Chicago, celebrated the solemn requiem mass. Burial followed in the church cemetery.

Note: The information for this story has been pieced together from pieces in “Hannibal, Too”, by J. Hurley and Roberta Hagood; from Kate Ray Kuhn’s book, “The History of Marion County, Missouri,” from early Hannibal and Ralls County newspaper articles, accessible via journals.com; from Hannibal City Directories, accessible through the Hannibal Free Public Library website; and Quincy Digital Journals, accessible through the Quincy Public Library website. The St. Louis Globe Democrat’s article on Palmyra Avenue in its July 1, 1900 edition also provided background information.

Mary Lou Montgomery, retired as editor of the Hannibal (Mo.) Courier-Post in 2014. She researches and writes narrative-style stories about the people who served as the foundation for the founding of this region. Books available on Amazon.com by this author include, but are not limited to: “The Notorious Madam Shaw”, “Pioneers in Medicine from Northeast Missouri” and “The Historic Murphy House, Hannibal, Mo., Circa 1870.” She can be contacted at Montgomery.editor@yahoo.com Her collective works can be found at www.maryloumontgomery.com


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“Daniel Boone – Long Hunter And More” Presented Saturday https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/daniel-boone-long-hunter-and-more-presented-saturday/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 13:40:19 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/daniel-boone-long-hunter-and-more-presented-saturday/ Written by Bill Fisher New Posted: September 17, 2021 A special presentation titled, Daniel Boone – A Long Hunter And More, will be presented by Boone descendant Robert Alvin Crum this Saturday, September 18 at the Hickory Ridge Living History Museum in Horn West. Discover Daniel Boone from Robert Alvin Crum, writer, speaker and visual […]]]>

A special presentation titled, Daniel Boone – A Long Hunter And More, will be presented by Boone descendant Robert Alvin Crum this Saturday, September 18 at the Hickory Ridge Living History Museum in Horn West.

Discover Daniel Boone from Robert Alvin Crum, writer, speaker and visual artist. He tells the stories of his ancestors Boone and Bryan living in North Carolina in the 18th century.

Robert Alvin Crum is a direct descendant of Daniel Boone and Rebecca Bryan and their daughter Lavina. He is a board member of the Boone Society, Inc. and a hereditary member of the Society of Boonesborough through eight of his ancestors.

After years of researching his ancestors Boone and Bryan in the colonial backcountry of North Carolina, he began and continues the award-winning “Return to the Land of My Ancestors” project. As part of this project, he complements and exhibits paintings, writes and is employed for speaking engagements. He resides in North Carolina at Salisbury and in the mountains at Burnsville.

This Saturday at Hickory Ridge’s Fall High Country Rendezvous event, Mr. Crum will be making presentations at 11:30 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. on his direct ancestor Daniel Boone. The topic of discussion is “Daniel Boone – A Long Hunter & More”. The location will be the Hickory Ridge History Museum in Daniel Boone Park adjacent to the “Horn in the West” Amphitheater. This takes place during the museum’s ‘Fall Rendezvous in the Country’, which features open-hearth cooking, tavern talks and a long-term hunters camp, which runs from 10:00 am to 2:00 p.m. The cost is $ 10 for adults and $ 7 for children aged 5 to 12.

You can find out more online at HickoryRidgeMuseum.com.


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The oldest living member of the Lexington Fire Department looks back on the station’s 150-year history https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/the-oldest-living-member-of-the-lexington-fire-department-looks-back-on-the-stations-150-year-history/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 03:14:00 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/the-oldest-living-member-of-the-lexington-fire-department-looks-back-on-the-stations-150-year-history/ LEXINGTON, Ky. (WKYT) – For 150 years, the people of Lexington have called on members of the Lexington Fire Department to come to their aid in an emergency. Brave men and women always run into danger to save lives. Their sacrifice does not go unnoticed and was officially recognized Thursday by the urban county government […]]]>

LEXINGTON, Ky. (WKYT) – For 150 years, the people of Lexington have called on members of the Lexington Fire Department to come to their aid in an emergency.

Brave men and women always run into danger to save lives. Their sacrifice does not go unnoticed and was officially recognized Thursday by the urban county government of Lexington-Fayette County.

One man who has been honored is Major Orville Cook. He served for 28 years with the department, Kentucky’s largest, from the 1950s to the 1980s. At 91, Cook is the oldest living member of the firefighters. He says since his days the industry has been very different and safer.

“The equipment was pretty bad, until the creation of NASA,” Cook recalls. “Some of the things they’ve developed have definitely helped the firefighters. Breathing apparatus for one. The coats we are wearing now can get very hot. Before, it was just a simple canvas with a piece of rubber underneath.

Cook says he can talk all day about his time with the department, the memories he made, the friendships he made and the lives he helped save.

“One in particular, a guy was underground for an hour and five minutes … and we dug up this man.” It took us until 4:00 am the next morning to get it out because it was collapsing. The man is walking the streets today, and that was one of my biggest thrills.

However, Cook’s greatest legacy is something that continues to this day. He was instrumental in fixing a faulty pension system for firefighters for decades to come.

“It’s a shame as it was years ago. When I arrived in the department, a widow could earn $ 50 per month. They were expected to make a living from it, and it hit me in the face. I am not the only one to have worked on this pension, believe me. There was a committee there that was dedicated and sometimes took risks, but we got it through. These guys have a terrific pension, and should. “

The department has several events to mark the 150th anniversary of the department, including a parade through the city center on Sunday evening at 6:00 p.m.

Copyright 2021 WKYT. All rights reserved.


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WWII air show returns to Dallas skies with re-enactment of Pearl Harbor https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/wwii-air-show-returns-to-dallas-skies-with-re-enactment-of-pearl-harbor/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 16:35:56 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/wwii-air-show-returns-to-dallas-skies-with-re-enactment-of-pearl-harbor/ The Wings Over Dallas WWII Airshow, one of the region’s largest air shows, will return after a year-long hiatus due to the pandemic, which will take place October 29-31 at the Dallas Executive Airport. The annual interactive event, presented by the Commemorative Air Force, features flight demonstrations, battle reenactments, veteran appearances, living history camps, hands-on […]]]>

The Wings Over Dallas WWII Airshow, one of the region’s largest air shows, will return after a year-long hiatus due to the pandemic, which will take place October 29-31 at the Dallas Executive Airport.

The annual interactive event, presented by the Commemorative Air Force, features flight demonstrations, battle reenactments, veteran appearances, living history camps, hands-on family and educational activities, airplane rides, tours from the cockpit, and more.

More than 40 World War II planes – including bombers, fighters and support planes – are expected to take part in the air show. This year’s theme, “Texas Goes to War,” will highlight the Lone Star State’s significant contributions to supporting America’s victory, including training fields, manufacturing companies and the defense of the Third Coast. to supply oil to the troops.

The featured artist for this year’s event will be TORA TORA TORA, a popular aerial reenactment of Pearl Harbor. Visitors will also be able to see planes like the B-29 Superfortress FIFI, B-24 Liberator Diamond Lil, C-47 That’s All, Brother and B-17 Flying Fortress Texas Raiders. Fighter jets such as the P-51 Mustang, P-40 Warhawk, T-6 Texan and many more will participate in aerial activities and re-enactments of aerial battles, with pyrotechnic effects.

On the grounds, living history encampments will take the crowds back in time, and members of the greater generation, including WWII veterans, who will share their personal stories of service and sacrifice.

“We are delighted that Wings Over Dallas is back this fall,” Hank Coats, President and CEO of the CAF, said in a statement. “As we didn’t have the show last year due to the COVID pandemic, this year our returning guests will notice the new Henry B. Tippie National Aviation Education Center, the 47,000 square foot facility of FAC which serves as a hub for our national educational action. programs. “

Tickets for CAF Wings Over Dallas, which range from $ 10 to $ 79, are now on sale at wingsoverdallas.org, with advance purchase discounts available. Rides in many WWII planes are also available on the website.


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Who are the Koi? A brief history of their culture https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/who-are-the-koi-a-brief-history-of-their-culture/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 01:28:39 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/who-are-the-koi-a-brief-history-of-their-culture/ The Koi Nation is one of 109 federally recognized Indigenous tribes in California and is part of the Pomo people of Southeast Sonoma County. The president and vice-president of the tribe, Darin and Dino Beltran, are brothers and come from a family of spiritual leaders. They talked about the history and culture of their tribe. […]]]>

The Koi Nation is one of 109 federally recognized Indigenous tribes in California and is part of the Pomo people of Southeast Sonoma County.

The president and vice-president of the tribe, Darin and Dino Beltran, are brothers and come from a family of spiritual leaders. They talked about the history and culture of their tribe.

Story

Before colonization, the Pomo Indians lived throughout north-central California. The ancestors of the Koi Nation were part of the Southeastern Pomo people who lived on Koi Island in Clear Lake, according to the site of the tribe.

The tribe’s name comes from their original homeland, the village of Koi, and the name means “people of the water,” according to Dino Beltran.

The tribe was known as the “Lower Lake Rancheria” until a name change in 2012 to better reflect its cultural heritage.

When the colonizers arrived in Northern California, the Pomo people were subjected to genocide, slavery, and diseases that wiped out other native tribes as well.

The Koi tribe signed two treaties in 1851 and 1852 that were supposed to give them land, but those treaties were not ratified by Congress, and the Koi found themselves essentially landless and squatting on the island, said Dino Beltran.

In 1916, the US Bureau of Indian Affairs purchased the “Purvis Flat,” a 141-acre expanse in Lake County, which became the Rancheria of the Koi Nation, according to a tribal story described in a 2019 court case.

The case, Koi Nation of Northern California v. US Department of the Interior, was linked to the tribe’s lawsuit for rights and was ultimately decided in their favor.

“But it was uninhabitable,” said Dino Beltran. There was “no water. It was very rocky and you couldn’t grow anything there so no one lived there.

In 1947, the Bureau ordered the Koi families to live on the property or lose their rights to it. In 1950, only seven members of the tribe and their families remained in the rancheria.

In 1956, “the federal government sold the lands of the Koi Nation and treated the tribe as if it no longer existed,” according to the 2019 case.

In December 2000, the Home Office “sought to correct its mistake” and the Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs reaffirmed the tribe’s status as a federally recognized tribe, the court document said.

At the turn of the 20th century, Tribal Captain Tom Johnson – Darin and Dino Beltran’s grandfather – and his brother John Johnson established a commercial orchard in Sevastopol, according to the Koi Nation’s application for trust status, a first step towards obtaining playing rights.

The Johnson brothers led the tribe from 1919 to the 1940s, and the tribe has been established in Sonoma County ever since, even though they did not have a reservation.

Koi culture

Dino Beltran said that before colonization, the Koi way of life revolved around “the complex spiritual connection with the living environment of the surrounding area”.

Like other Pomo tribes in California, their spirituality is based on the belief that everything in the natural world was created by the Creator and “should be embraced and respected,” said Dino Beltran.

Traditional ceremonies include praying in a rotunda, eating traditional food and attending a sweat lodge, he added.

Several members of the tribe are still part of the rotunda way of life, known as the “bole malu”, which revolves around prayer and spirituality.

The sacred Pomo practice of praying in a rotunda is “a beautiful thing,” he said.

Like other Pomo tribes, the Koi make traditional jewelry cut from white magnesite gemstones, which they also used as currency, Dino Beltran said.

The Koi ancestors and the Elem and Kamdot tribes shared a common language that is rooted in the Hokan language, which is considered one of the oldest languages ​​in California, according to Beltran.

Today

The Koi Nation has 90 members, most of whom live in Sonoma County, Dino Beltran said.

The Koi have revitalized their language with the help of linguists at UC Berkeley.

“Unfortunately, the majority of our tribal members live in poverty,” Beltran said. They hope their plans to build a casino will enable them to become economically independent and provide jobs for tribal members and the local community, he said.

“This is an important step forward for the Koi Nation and our people,” said President Darin Beltran, adding that the project would ensure the economic stability of the Koi people and “help the residents of Sonoma County.”

“We believe this project is a symbolic moment in the history of our people and we look forward to seeing its completion in the years to come,” he said.

Read more about the Koi tribe in Sunday’s Press Democrat.

You can contact Editor-in-Chief Alana Minkler at 707-521-5224 or alana.minkler@pressdemocrat.com. On Twitter @alana_minkler.


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Local veterans bond and community in weekly meetings https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/local-veterans-bond-and-community-in-weekly-meetings/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 00:00:53 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/local-veterans-bond-and-community-in-weekly-meetings/ COLORADO SPRINGS – The power of veteran friendship can go a long way, and it happens every Wednesday morning at the Black Eyed Pea restaurant in Colorado Springs. A large group of veterans meets at the North Academy restaurant around 10:30 a.m. every Wednesday morning. It is a chance for them to listen to each […]]]>

COLORADO SPRINGS – The power of veteran friendship can go a long way, and it happens every Wednesday morning at the Black Eyed Pea restaurant in Colorado Springs.

A large group of veterans meets at the North Academy restaurant around 10:30 a.m. every Wednesday morning. It is a chance for them to listen to each other’s stories during the war and after, but it is also an opportunity to build a community with other veterans.

The weekly meeting began over ten years ago when six veterans met at another restaurant in town. Roger Fortin, an 89-year-old veteran, started organizing the rallies back then and through his efforts they have grown into the great gatherings that take place today.

“About 14 years ago I came here on a trip and called two of the guys I was stationed with there, and we met for coffee,” said Fortin, who served in the US Navy for six years and the
US Air Force for 17 years. He also spent over four years in Vietnam while on duty, and was stationed at Cheyenne Mountain.

Fortin also calls and reminds the veterans of the meeting.

“There were six of us 14 years ago, and now there are over 200 on my phone that I call quite frequently. A lot of them don’t have much other means than this, to meet people. and other veterans, ”says Fortin.

Veterinarians of all ages, branches and grades join every week. One of them is Bill Roche, a 96 year old US Army veteran.

“I started serving in the Air Force during World War II and enlisted in June 1943 at the age of 18,” Roche said.

Roche mentioned that he had met around 30 to 40 people and was able to connect with others, young and old, at the weekly gatherings.

“They all have different stories and things to tell, and you meet a lot of different people,” Roche said. “When you get to my age you don’t have much to do, so this is the event of the week to come here and talk to people.”

For many, including Blake Lindner, a US Air Force veteran, it was also the highlight of their week.

“I love meeting other veterans. It’s like living history, especially veterans of WWII, Korea and Vietnam, and it allows me to recharge my battery. I love coming. here and look forward to every Wednesday, ”Lindner said.

For Gloria Varner, the general manager of the restaurant, she is more than happy to welcome the group because she too comes from a military family. His brother was a Navy for 23 years and his son was in the Navy for five years.

“It is such an honor to have everyone here because they are the ones who helped make this country what it is today,” said Varner. “It’s a big, happy family. They all hug each other when they come in, they hug each other when they go out, and it’s such an honor to be with them every week.”

While they all have different stories to tell, it’s the camaraderie and community that brought them all together.
“That’s what brings them together. They have the same common core of experiences, even though it’s a different war, they can still communicate and they do,” Fortin said. “We also recognize those who are missing but never forgotten and those who were part of the group who are no longer with us.”

Sometimes Fortin also calls the veterans ahead and asks them to come in uniform.


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AHARI launches the Armenian Chronicles: A Living History https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/ahari-launches-the-armenian-chronicles-a-living-history/ Wed, 01 Sep 2021 23:58:14 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/ahari-launches-the-armenian-chronicles-a-living-history/ PROVIDENCE, RI – A letter to the Armenian community in Rhode Island begins: “Our personal stories shape us. Like ocean currents, they influence every stage of our life… especially when we give them words. The story of the Armenian people is a story of resilience through glory and tragedy. It is a story that deserves […]]]>

PROVIDENCE, RI – A letter to the Armenian community in Rhode Island begins: “Our personal stories shape us. Like ocean currents, they influence every stage of our life… especially when we give them words. The story of the Armenian people is a story of resilience through glory and tragedy. It is a story that deserves to be preserved, not only to understand us better, but also as a gift for those who are not yet born.

Thereupon, the Armenian Historical Association of Rhode Island (AHARI) announced the launch of “Armenian Chronicles: A Living History”. The intention of the research initiative is to preserve the stories of the Armenian people of Rhode Island through films, photographs, letters and interviews while it is still possible.

“Every Armenian family in RI has an important story to tell, and we would love to hear yours! the committee is enthusiastic about its promotional material. If you have a story about your Armenian ancestors, if this is how and when they came to Rhode Island, or if they belonged to a particular village or a benevolent organization, or the story behind a precious antiquity brought from the homeland, or thoughts on their resilience, or pictures, diaries, letters or other keepsakes from your archives, AHARI would love to hear from you.

Their desire is to create a culture of sharing so that a collective history of Armenians in IR can be documented and supported. Articles can be scanned and sent to AHARI or a scanning assistance session can be scheduled via email [email protected]. The group also created a community questionnaire accessible through its website: ahari.clubexpress.com.

Guest contributor

Guest contributions to Armenian Weekly are informative articles or press releases written and submitted by members of the community.

Guest contributor


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Retired principal translates his love for history in Huntsville street names book https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/retired-principal-translates-his-love-for-history-in-huntsville-street-names-book/ Sat, 28 Aug 2021 21:37:36 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/retired-principal-translates-his-love-for-history-in-huntsville-street-names-book/ Michael Walmsley has always been interested in history, but it was out of a desire to better orient himself in the city that he started a new business: a historical book on the street names of Huntsville. Walmsley lived in the Huntsville area for approximately 15 years before settling there permanently in 2016. “Although I […]]]>

Michael Walmsley has always been interested in history, but it was out of a desire to better orient himself in the city that he started a new business: a historical book on the street names of Huntsville.

Walmsley lived in the Huntsville area for approximately 15 years before settling there permanently in 2016.

“Although I know Huntsville a little bit, I have kind of a challenge in terms of directionality, so I decided I had better learn the streets,” he laughs. This led to an interest in learning where the street names came from.

In the Muskoka Room of the Huntsville Public Library, he began to research the names.

“The first one I ran into Cora Street… I found some information on Cora Shay and it kind of piqued my interest in what was going on at the time and why her name was on that street,” he remembers. “I became really intrigued by his story and it led his siblings to have names on the streets and then spill over into other names.”

Walmsley is president of the PROBUS Club of Muskoka North. Club members who have lived their entire lives in Huntsville were able to provide more details.

“It was more of a hobby than anything else,” he says. “I started writing short articles about these streets for no one in particular. And then the pandemic happened… I decided to send a weekly email to the members just to keep everyone connected at a time when we couldn’t physically meet and I just decided that some of these Street articles would be appropriate to include in these emails. “

They liked them so much that some of the members encouraged him to publish the articles in a book. This book, Streetscapes: a journey through the history of Huntsville through its road signs, will be in press in early September.

A preview of the cover of Michael Walmsley’s new book

Walmsley starts off with 100 copies to gauge interest and hopes he provides a light and connected Huntsville history through his signage.

“As I discovered during my stay in the Muskoka Room at the Library, Huntsville is truly blessed that many people, well over a century old, have now taken the time to record aspects of the city. I really found it rewarding, ”he says. “I was able to discover some really special little facts because people took the time to talk about them.

“This is also part of the intention of this book. Hopefully this will get some young people interested in the history of the city and why things are called as they are called.

He congratulated those who set up and maintained the Muskoka Room at the library. “They really deserve huge credit for what they do. For people to go there and be able to browse the documents, it is a real living story of all their efforts. Well done to them.

Walmsley shared several excerpts from the book with Huntsville Doppler, which you can read here.

Streetscapes: a journey through the history of Huntsville through its road signs will be available around September 1st. You can order a copy by emailing Michael Walmsley at boofpublishing1@gmail.com or copies will also be available at The Great Vine (36 Main St. E).

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Anniversary celebration, museum opening scheduled for Saturday | New https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/anniversary-celebration-museum-opening-scheduled-for-saturday-new/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/anniversary-celebration-museum-opening-scheduled-for-saturday-new/ The sixth annual Hanover AutumnFest, presented by Anton Paar, is the Hanover Tavern Foundation’s community event of the year. The tavern grounds become the backdrop for a day of food, family entertainment and live music. The on-site event features smoked pork, turkey and brisket, Brunswick Stew, side dishes and fresh pies from Hanover Tavern Restaurant. […]]]>

The sixth annual Hanover AutumnFest, presented by Anton Paar, is the Hanover Tavern Foundation’s community event of the year. The tavern grounds become the backdrop for a day of food, family entertainment and live music.

The on-site event features smoked pork, turkey and brisket, Brunswick Stew, side dishes and fresh pies from Hanover Tavern Restaurant. Plus, there’s local craft beer and wine, live music, and games and activities for the kids. Activities for kids include decorating pumpkins, a petting zoo, a hay slide, face painting, a scavenger hunt, a magic show, and children’s crafts. Admission is free and open to the public.

See hanovertavern.org or call (804) 537-5050 for more details on this great Hanover event.

On Saturday October 2, Patrick Henry’s Scotchtown will be holding its “300th Anniversary and Fall Festival” from 10 am to 5 pm. Enjoy live music, food trucks, a petting zoo, a selection of drinks, and ongoing tours of Scotchtown. Renowned historian and author of James Beard’s award-winning book The Cooking Gene, Michael Twitty, will demonstrate home cooking and discuss Afro-Atlantic culinary history. Historian and storyteller Valerie Davis will discuss the African-American experience. Also present will be the Library of Virginia with information on genealogical research, the Sailors’ Museum showcasing the African Maritime Kingdoms, and the master gardeners of Hanover discussing the landscape and gardens. Living history performers representing Patrick Henry, Sarah Henry and Charles Chiswell will be present as well as traditional artisans demonstrating their crafts and selling their wares. Proceeds from the event go to Scotchtown’s Raise the Roof campaign to replace the building’s roof and protect the collections and programs therein. See preservationvirginia.org / historic-sites / patrick-henrys / scotchtown / or call (804) 227-3500 for details.


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