Living History – Suffolk BRC http://suffolkbrc.org.uk/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 06:03:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/default-150x150.png Living History – Suffolk BRC http://suffolkbrc.org.uk/ 32 32 Judy Baca, the famous Chicana muralist who paints Los Angeles’ forgotten history: “My art is meant to heal” | Art https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/judy-baca-the-famous-chicana-muralist-who-paints-los-angeles-forgotten-history-my-art-is-meant-to-heal-art/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 06:03:00 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/judy-baca-the-famous-chicana-muralist-who-paints-los-angeles-forgotten-history-my-art-is-meant-to-heal-art/ Judy Baca still remembers the day in the 1970s when the curator of an exhibit featuring the work of emerging Los Angeles artists told him she couldn’t include Baca in the exhibit. “They’re just people touched by an angel,” Baca recalls saying of the group of all-male performers she selected. The message was clear: Baca […]]]>

Judy Baca still remembers the day in the 1970s when the curator of an exhibit featuring the work of emerging Los Angeles artists told him she couldn’t include Baca in the exhibit. “They’re just people touched by an angel,” Baca recalls saying of the group of all-male performers she selected. The message was clear: Baca was not worthy of a museum.

Fifty years later, Baca is an internationally acclaimed artist, whose large-scale public works of art have left an unparalleled mark on LA’s artistic landscape. And the Chicana muralist, scholar and activist is now getting a long-awaited big audience acknowledgement. The Museum of Latin American Art (Molaa) in Long Beach, California is hosting the first major retrospective on his work, and a major Pin up at the Museum of Contemporary Art (Moca) in Los Angeles is scheduled for September.

“I never expected to be part of the 1% who would live off my art,” Baca, 75, said in a recent interview. “This is the first time in my career that people have been looking to buy my work, to own pieces from the Judy Baca collection.”

The Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach, California is organizing the first major retrospective of his work. Photography: Courtesy of MOLAA

For years, Baca said, the white, male-dominated art industry didn’t care about her. “My work has been ignored a lot in Los Angeles…and the men here have been quite profoundly unable to see women as their peers. This has been my lifelong struggle as a Chicana, activist and feminist. This created an indifferent attitude for me. I just had to see what I was doing as important to me and my community and move forward with will and conviction, supported by the people in the community I was working with – not the arts.

Baca was born in Watts, an LA neighborhood known for the 1965 uprisings, and grew up in Pacoima, near the LA River. His grandparents came from Mexico to La Junta, Colorado during the Mexican Revolution, a story told in his Denver airport mural, The Memory of Nuestra Tierra, and at the entrance to his retrospective Molaa.

“This was the first mass migration of Mexicans to the United States…even though in some ways we didn’t cross the border, the border did cross us,” she said.

While her mother worked in a factory in her early childhood, her grandmother raised her and had a huge affecting on her creativity: “My grandmother had a special relationship with the spirit world. She would start my day by saying, “What did you dream of? … I realized there was more to experience than just what was visible, tangible.

Her grandmother’s indigenous identity also shaped her: “People couldn’t take ownership of their indigeneity, because it wasn’t seen as attractive or good. But my grandmother was native and she looked like Apache. Baca’s grandmother practiced a kind of “curanderismo”, that is, people came to see her for advice and healing.

Baca’s mother feared she was not making a living as an artist and encouraged her to pursue a degree in education – a path that led her to muralism.

Baca created her first mural while working in a Catholic high school, to channel students’ interest in graffiti. (She was later expelled from school after marching against the Vietnam War.)

Hundreds of young people - some of whom were diverted from the criminal justice system - worked with Baca to create the Great Wall of Los Angeles.
Hundreds of young people – some of whom were diverted from the criminal justice system – worked with Baca to create the Great Wall of Los Angeles. Photography: Courtesy of SPARC

In 1974, she started the City of LA’s first mural program, which produced more than 400 murals and, soon after, co-founded the Social and Public Art Resource Center (Sparc), a center for public art community organization, housed in a former prison.

Baca began building the Great Wall of Los Angeles in 1976 along the Tujunga Washhouse in the San Fernando Valley with the idea of ​​painting a “tattoo on the scar where the river once flowed”. Originally appointed California History, the mural is one of the longest around the world and portrays the forgotten stories of people of color in California.

For five years, she worked with hundreds of young people – some of whom were diverted from the criminal justice system – to paint a visual history of stories that disappeared with the river, from prehistoric times to the 1950s.

Stories within 2,754 feet wall include a little known massacre Chinese in Los Angeles in 1871; the mass deportations Mexican Americans in the 1930s; and a portrait of Luisa Moreno, a farmers union organizer in the 1940s.

“What I learned from the young people who participated was that it forever changed the way they saw themselves,” Baca said. “We were in segregated communities… but they were all kind of ‘outcasts’, seen as young people who will never make it. But this mixture with each other, which lasted a lifetime, was a remarkable change.

In 1980, Baca became a professor of studio art at the University of California, the only Chicana with a tenured position in visual arts and one of the few senior Chicana professors in the public university system.

The Molaa exhibition understand over 110 works by Baca, highlighting the history of the Great Wall and featuring ancient paintings, sculptures and drawings. There are portraits of her dressed as “pachuca” in the 1970s for LA first all-Chicana show; its striking Josefina: Ofrenda to the housekeeper to print; a vendor cart painted with stories of the criminalization of undocumented migrants; and study the drawings of the Wall of the World, its wall who traveled the world.

Gabriela Urtiaga, Molaa’s chief curator, said in an email that Baca “always has [been] and continues to be a central figure in search of new alternatives to speak of silent voices and the figure of women as an essential part of her creative work”, adding: “Judy rethinks a collective memory and identity as a fundamental link in building women’s power – Chicana, Latina, women of color.

Some of the most compelling exhibits capture the obstacles she overcame. On a draft drawing of a wall commissioned for the University of Southern California in the 1990s, she wrote criticisms of administrators who attempted to censor the painting, which depicted conflict, violence and resistance movements involving Latinos in Los Angeles: “Judy , we think this mural is not understandable for an English-speaking audience and is too negative.The story you represent is depressing.

“I don’t make history, I just paint about it,” she replied of the mural project.

The exhibition also chronicles the reaction to Indigenous Dances, a monument she created in 1994 at an LA train station, meant to honor the area’s indigenous history. In 2005, an anti-immigrant group, Save Our State, protested the monument; the images on display closely resemble the white supremacist rallies of recent years and the growing pressure to erase the teachings of racism in America.

Part of the Great Wall of Los Angeles that Baca painted as a
A section of the Great Wall of Los Angeles which Baca painted as a “tattoo on the scar where the river once flowed”. Photograph: Image courtesy of SPARC Archive

“I hope the show reminds people that we face the same thing over and over again, and if we don’t fix it, we have to keep reliving it,” Baca said, adding that seeing decades of his work organized in a museum format has been validated.

“I always thought that I would do a work and it would pass into the ether, never to be seen again or talked about again,” she said. “But I realized that when I did, I was dealing with my hands and with my art. I was finding a way to live with the truth that was hard and difficult. It was a way to keep myself sane and to keep myself in the process of healing and healing those around me…and I learned that my instincts were right.

Why does she believe she is finally getting proper recognition?

“Maybe they think I’m going to die,” she laughed, adding that recent social justice uprisings have forced the arts to come to terms. For so long, she said, “It was the gatekeepers and the remarkable failure to deal with the Latino community in a real way. I think it’s a lot about references and metaphors that define a people as “outsiders”.

Last year, the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art acquired the archives related to the Great Wall, and the Andrew W Mellon Foundation awarded Sparc $5 million to enlarge the wall to include stories from the 1960s through 2020. The 1960s section will feature a “burning generation” fighting Jim Crow and Alabama firefighters hosing down protesters. The 1970s will begin with the occupation of Alcatraz, with a Quote of Chief Oglala Lakota Red Cloud: “They made us many promises…but they only kept one; they promised to take our land, and they did.

While Baca is optimistic about her future plans, she is discouraged by the state of the art form: “Muralism as a whole has been diminished in Los Angeles. It’s completely commercial. The only things that can be done are those paid for by the companies that want to decorate the buildings.

She lamented that the city doesn’t have the kind of public program it started in the 1970s, noting how the murals can shape our understanding of history and “create sites of public memory” when they are made with communities: “Murals can do amazing work in the world. , because they live in the places where people live and work, because they can be made in relation to the people who see them, because the people themselves can have their say, if it is done in a profound way. And that’s what I intend to continue to do as long as I’m here on earth.

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Fighting disinformation: Professor Hendrix’s open-access course and New York exhibit highlight the need for media literacy https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/fighting-disinformation-professor-hendrixs-open-access-course-and-new-york-exhibit-highlight-the-need-for-media-literacy/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 16:47:02 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/fighting-disinformation-professor-hendrixs-open-access-course-and-new-york-exhibit-highlight-the-need-for-media-literacy/ CONWAY, Ark. (January 20, 2022) – Dr. Joshua Glick wants you (and everyone else) to know that seeing doesn’t always have to be believing. Glick, Isabelle Peregrin Odyssey Assistant Professor of English Film and Media Studies at Hendrix College and a fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), designed “Media Literacy in the Age […]]]>

CONWAY, Ark. (January 20, 2022) – Dr. Joshua Glick wants you (and everyone else) to know that seeing doesn’t always have to be believing.

Glick, Isabelle Peregrin Odyssey Assistant Professor of English Film and Media Studies at Hendrix College and a fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), designed “Media Literacy in the Age of Deepfakes.” Created in collaboration with colleagues at MIT’s Center for Advanced Virtuality and hosted by OpenCourseWare, the open-access online course is available free of charge to anyone with an internet connection.

Building on this project, Glick also co-curated with Barbara Miller an exhibition currently on view at the Museum of the Moving Image (MoMI) in New York: Deepfake: unstable evidence on screen. The show will continue until May 15, 2022.

Cultivate media literacy

The course, available at https://deepfakes.virtuality.mit.edu, teaches students and teachers about the history of media manipulation, the rise of “deepfake” videos, and some civic applications of emerging technologies. It is important to note that the individual course modules aim to teach digital media literacy, which includes sharing tools and techniques to combat the spread of disinformation.

Screenshot of the Glick OpenAccess courseGlick’s teaching and civic engagement work at Hendrix is ​​directly related to this material. English majors recently enjoyed its fall 2021 course, The media in the age of fake news, a seminar that contributes to the media studies component of the department’s curriculum.

“The course approaches this pressing topic from a variety of angles,” Glick said, noting that everyone from journalists to technologists to public policy experts to everyday citizens is interested in these issues. “First, we dive deep into the history of misinformation, then some of the recent forms we’re seeing, and finally a discussion of what we can do to fight back.”

The online course includes a suite of three modules and numerous teaching resources. “The project provided the R&D to create new in-person courses and incorporate new units into classes such as Contemporary documentary and Introduction to Film Studies“, Glick said. “It also gave me ideas for future events of the Pericles Project and more writing for the public. And I love how what we talk about in class can live on and benefit a larger community.

The course can be completed in as little or as much time as the user chooses to commit. Although a teacher can choose to assign a module as a detailed assignment, they can also use it as a starting point for an entire course.

An exhibition demonstrates the danger of deepfakes

With advances in machine learning technology enabling the creation of deepfakes, it has never been harder to separate fact from fiction and truth from illusion on screen. Deepfake videos use artificial intelligence (AI) to simulate people saying or doing things they never said or did. With social media enabling the sharing of moving images with large segments of the population in ever shorter timeframes, deepfakes are more immediately believed or challenged based on the viewer’s entrenched perspective.

Photo of the Glick MoMI exhibitionDeepfake: unstable evidence on screendemonstrates the instability of on-screen truths and places them in a historical continuum from the late 19th to the early 21st century.

The centerpiece of the exhibition is In the event of a lunar disaster, a deepfake art installation co-directed by Francesca Panetta and Halsey Burgund that uses AI technology to conjecture an alternate history of the Apollo 11 mission, shown on a TV in a vintage living room. Glick was the education producer for In the event of a lunar disaster, an MIT Center for Advanced Virtuality production that won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Interactive Media in 2021.

To organize the exhibit, Glick worked with Barbara Miller, MoMI’s deputy director for curatorial affairs. “It has been such an enriching experience. Given all that is happening in the United States and around the world, it is important that people have a critical understanding of the dangers and progressive possibilities of emerging technologies. Teaching in a liberal arts environment really propelled this work and facilitated my collaboration with the museum. In turn, I’m excited to bring students to the show (covid permitting) and continue to incorporate what I learn into my coursework. »

About Joshua Glick

Joshua Glick joined the faculty at Hendrix College in 2015. He holds a Ph.D. in Film and Media Studies and American Studies from Yale University. His research and teaching explore global documentary, critical race studies, emerging media, and Hollywood as an evolving form of industrial and artistic production. Glick is currently writing a book that examines how the rise of post-1989 neoliberalism and seismic shifts in media industries have galvanized interest in documentary from both the left and right of the political spectrum. Together with Patricia Aufderheide, he also co-edits the Oxford Handbook of Documentary, which engages scholars and practitioners in dialogue about the ethics and art of social justice filmmaking.

Glick’s film and public humanities projects involve collaboration with archives, museums and community media organizations. He served as Moving Image Curator for the NEH-funded exhibition, Coney Island: Visions of an American Dreamland, 1861-2008.

About Hendrix College

A private liberal arts college in Conway, Arkansas, Hendrix College is consistently recognized as one of the nation’s leading liberal arts institutions and is listed in Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change The Way You Think About Colleges. Its academic quality and rigor, innovation and value have made Hendrix a fixture in many university guides, lists and rankings. Founded in 1876, Hendrix has been affiliated with The United Methodist Church since 1884. To learn more, visit www.hendrix.edu.

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Carolinas Aviation Museum to be renamed in honor of Captain “Sully” Sullenberger | News https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/carolinas-aviation-museum-to-be-renamed-in-honor-of-captain-sully-sullenberger-news/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/carolinas-aviation-museum-to-be-renamed-in-honor-of-captain-sully-sullenberger-news/ CHARLOTTE, North Carolina, January 16, 2022 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — Ahead of the 13th anniversary of the “Miracle on the Hudson” flight tomorrow, the Carolinas Aviation Museum (CAM) announces that it will be renamed in honor of Captain Chesley Burnett “Sully” Sullenberger III, who, with the crew of US Airways Flight 1549, heroically landed the plane in […]]]>

CHARLOTTE, North Carolina, January 16, 2022 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — Ahead of the 13th anniversary of the “Miracle on the Hudson” flight tomorrow, the Carolinas Aviation Museum (CAM) announces that it will be renamed in honor of Captain Chesley Burnett “Sully” Sullenberger III, who, with the crew of US Airways Flight 1549, heroically landed the plane in the Hudson River and saved all lives on board. The Museum will officially announce its new official name later this year.

When it reopens in 2023, the Smithsonian branch will also house a permanent exhibit honoring the captain and crew of the flight, including the “Miracle on the Hudson” plane, which previously drew more than 74,000 visitors to the museum each year. .

“I am forever indebted to Captain Sully and the crew of US Airways Flight 1549 for my second chance at life, and for 13 years I have been determined to find a way to honor them,” the CEO said. Red Ventures and crash survivor. Eric Elias, who personally donated $1 million towards the reopening of the Museum, alongside a $500,000 gift from Lonely Planet, a brand of Red Ventures. “Heroes are created long before the day they are called into action. This museum will serve as a lasting tribute to the preparation, courage and dedication of the Captain and all of the crew.”

This donation brings CAM’s launch campaign funding to more than $11 million, almost halfway to its goal of $25 million.

The renamed and revamped museum will feature a new main gallery, visitor center, plaza and newly restored historic hangar, as well as dozens of interactive aircraft and cockpits, flight simulators and historical artifacts that chronicle the connection indelible image of our region with the marvels of flight and aeronautical innovation. The Museum will also highlight STEM/aviation and aerospace programming that connects students to the explosion of STEM career opportunities. The new concept was developed by Freeman Ryan Design, one of the world’s foremost authorities on creating compelling exhibits, museums and visitor experiences, and will be located on the site of the historic WPA/Douglas Hangar in Charlotte Douglas International Airport.

“We are thrilled to honor Captain Sully and the heroic crew of the ‘Miracle on the Hudson’ and to cement our city’s place in aviation history,” said the chairman of the board. of the museum. Mark Oke. “With the support of the city of Charlotte, Charlotte Douglas International Airport and generous private donors, we look forward to making the Museum the new premier aviation destination in the South. »

About the Carolinas Aviation Museum

The Carolinas Aviation Museum – which will be renamed later this year in honor of Captain “Sully” Sullenberger – is Charlotte’s most uplifting destination, a place where visitors can be inspired by the everyday heroism of flight, learn about the science of aviation and its importance to our region, and experience the living history of flight through a large variety of artifacts and aircraft. Carolinas Aviation Museum is a recipient of support from the Infusion Fund, a partnership between the City of Charlotte, Foundation For The Carolinas, and generous donors to support the arts and culture sector. For more information, visithttp://www.carolinasaviation.org.

Media Contact

CLAIRE RIZER, Luquire, 1 7046546632, crizer@luquire.com

SOURCE Carolina Aviation Museum

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Harrison Coal & Reclamation considers new partnership | News, Sports, Jobs https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/harrison-coal-reclamation-considers-new-partnership-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 05:29:26 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/harrison-coal-reclamation-considers-new-partnership-news-sports-jobs/ Photo provided The Harrison Coal & Reclamation Historical Park and Military History Preservation Group will hold a meeting at 5:15 p.m. on January 29 at the Cadiz Inn, located at 82468 Cadiz-Jewett Road in Cadiz. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss a potential partnership between the two organizations to acquire land in Harrison […]]]>

Photo provided The Harrison Coal & Reclamation Historical Park and Military History Preservation Group will hold a meeting at 5:15 p.m. on January 29 at the Cadiz Inn, located at 82468 Cadiz-Jewett Road in Cadiz. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss a potential partnership between the two organizations to acquire land in Harrison County to build a living history center.

CADIZ — The Harrison Coal & Reclamation Historical Park may partner with the Military History Preservation Group to acquire 1,400 acres of land in the area to build a living history center.

The Harrison County Community Improvement Corp. contacted county historical park members in August regarding a possible partnership between the park and the Military History Preservation Group, a nonprofit organization dedicated to historic preservation.

The group, which coordinates historical reenactment events across the country, is seeking to acquire 1,400 acres of land in the area to build a history center that would include a museum that could draw attention to the area.

The two groups are due to hold their first meeting to discuss a possible partnership at 5:15 p.m. on January 29 at the Cadiz Inn, 82468 Cadiz-Jewett Road in Cadiz.

Coal Park Secretary Amy Welch said the entities were due to meet last year but everything was pushed back due to COVID-19. She said the meeting will give both groups a chance to discuss the proposed venture.

“This is the first time we will meet in person. … They (CIC officials) think our two groups would work well together, so it’s going to be a briefing just to see what everyone thinks — what do they expect from us and what do we expect from them ? she said. “They are looking to buy land and they just thought it would be helpful to join other groups. What we would bring to the table is big gear, and that kind of stuff was useful in the war story.

Welch said the coal yard currently leases land in New Athens for its equipment, although members hope to use some of the future property to expand.

“We have projects going on and we were happy where we are, but we would like a piece of land to be able to expand. … We’ve had plans for a long time for our own museum, because we have a lot of artifacts and different things that a museum could benefit from. We just can’t build them on the land we’re on right now, so we’ve always been looking for something like that,” she said.

If built, the Harrison Coal & Reclamation Historical Park Mining and Energy Museum would feature the history of mining, construction, transportation, agriculture, logging and oil and gas, and it would host events.

“It’s what made Harrison, Belmont and surrounding counties great, and we want to keep it alive,” she said of the area’s industrial past.

The Charcoal Park Group is always looking for volunteers or donations of heavy equipment.

“It’s a great moment. We’re always looking for people who are interested in old-time mining, old-time logging, industry, and people who like to run big equipment,” she said.

The dates of the partnership meetings will be announced on the coal organization’s Facebook page and website, hcrhp.org. For more information about the possible enterprise, to volunteer or to donate, email secretariat@hcrhp.org or amywelch1982@gmail.com.

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3rd ANNUAL GEORGE RANCH RODEO IN TRIBUTE TO THE BLACK COWBOY LEGACY OF FORT BEND COUNTY | Community https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/3rd-annual-george-ranch-rodeo-in-tribute-to-the-black-cowboy-legacy-of-fort-bend-county-community/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 17:41:00 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/3rd-annual-george-ranch-rodeo-in-tribute-to-the-black-cowboy-legacy-of-fort-bend-county-community/ RICHMOND – Discover the lasting legacy of African American cowboys in Fort Bend County history on Saturday February 19, 2022 at the third annual George Ranch rodeo! With all the favorite rodeo events (including bull riding, team lassoing, and horseback riding) plus kids’ activities, entertainment, and vendors, this rodeo will be a fun day at […]]]>

RICHMOND – Discover the lasting legacy of African American cowboys in Fort Bend County history on Saturday February 19, 2022 at the third annual George Ranch rodeo! With all the favorite rodeo events (including bull riding, team lassoing, and horseback riding) plus kids’ activities, entertainment, and vendors, this rodeo will be a fun day at the Ranch like no other!

“For over 100 years, black cowboys have played a vital role in the farming operations of Fort Bend County. At the George Ranch in particular, four generations of Black Cowboys have worked alongside four generations of the George family, leaving behind a rich Black Cowboy heritage unique to this part of Texas, ”said Claire Rogers, Executive Director of Fort Bend. History Association. . “The rodeo was born out of a desire to celebrate the skills and contributions of these extraordinary people.

This year’s event will showcase the history of black cowboys in Fort Bend County with a special spotlight on the Buster Jackson and Robert and Catherine Jackson families who were integral to the successful cattle operation at George Ranch. .

Fort Bend History Association board member Debra Greenwood-Sharp said she was thrilled to see the breeding and rodeo accomplishments of these families presented to the community.

“I am grateful – and so grateful! – to have the opportunity to share and promote the legacy of the many black cowboys who have traveled history here at George Ranch and elsewhere in Fort Bend County, ”she said.

The rodeo will feature special guests from Genet Chenier, DJ REM, Southern Konnection Dance Group, Iron Horse Guest Ranch, Buffalo Soldiers and All Glory Honor Guard. Rodeo events include Bull Riding, Ladies Barrel Races, Steer Wrestling, Calf Roping, Ladies Steer Undressing and Team Roping. Rodeo events for kids include sheep slaughter, barrel racing, breakaway and stowage. The slack starts at 11 a.m. with the grand entrance at 6.30 p.m. and the show time at 7 p.m.

“Our committee has worked tirelessly for months to ensure a fun and exciting day here at the ranch,” said Greenwood-Sharp. “You won’t want to miss it! “

Presale tickets are currently available online. General Rodeo tickets include entrance to the Arena only; Advantage seats include entry to the arena and the historic park. The pre-sale general admission cost is $ 5 for children ages 4 to 12 and $ 15 for adults. Advantage seats, which include admission to the historic park, are $ 12 for children aged 4 to 12 and $ 30 for adults. General admission tickets at the door are $ 10 for children ages 4 to 12 and $ 20 for adults. Advantage seats at the gate, which includes admission to the historic park, are $ 17 for children aged 4 to 12 and $ 35 for adults.

TO REGISTER FOR A RODEO EVENT:

The contractor in stock is RRJ Rodeo Enterprises. Registration is only possible by SMS from February 14 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Text 281-217-3951 to participate. Up-to-date negative Coggins are required; please bring an extra copy to the event. Major events cost $ 65 with $ 3,100 in extra cash. The slaughter of the sheep costs $ 30; junior / peewee events cost $ 30.

Tax Tech, Inc. • Patton Insurance and Financial Services • CenterPoint Energy • Law Office of Brian Knipling • Smith, Murdaugh, Little & Bonham, LLP • Boyd Ministries • Earnest & Debra Greenwood-Sharp

Co-Chairs: Debra Greenwood-Sharp and FBC Commissioner Grady Prestage

Jan Billups-Meitzen, Constance Bowie, Sierra Bowie, Paula Boyd, Mary Miller, Lauren Soliz, Patti Parish-Kaminski, Brenda Patton and Cee Cee Parker.

George Ranch Historical Park is located at 10215 FM 762 in Richmond. General admission to the historic park is $ 15 for adults 13 and over, $ 12 for people 65 and over, and $ 10 for children 4 to 12. Children three and under are free. Hours of operation are Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, visit www.georgeranch.org or call 281-343-0218.

ABOUT THE HISTORIC PARK:

George Ranch Historical Park is a living history museum that showcases Texas history from the 1830s to the 1930s. The park is anchored by four different visitor sites: the 1830s Jones Farm, the Ryon Prairie House 1860s, 1890s Victorian Davis Mansion and 1930s George Ranch Cattle Complex. Regular activities include tours of historic homes, living history demonstrations, hands-on activities, cattle-working demonstrations and tub soaking and more! Guests should allow three to four hours to visit the park and should dress for the weather.

George Ranch Historical Park is a living history partnership between the Fort Bend History Association, a 501 (c) 3 nonprofit, and the George Foundation, a Texas Charitable Trust.

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These are the deadliest residential fires in recent U.S. history https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/these-are-the-deadliest-residential-fires-in-recent-u-s-history/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 20:09:00 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/these-are-the-deadliest-residential-fires-in-recent-u-s-history/ January 5, 2022 A dozen people, including eight children, were killed when a fire devastated an overcrowded townhouse in Philadelphia, in one of the deadliest residential fires in the country’s recent history. Investigators are investigating the possibility that the fire was caused by a child playing with a lighter near a Christmas tree, according to […]]]>

A dozen people, including eight children, were killed when a fire devastated an overcrowded townhouse in Philadelphia, in one of the deadliest residential fires in the country’s recent history. Investigators are investigating the possibility that the fire was caused by a child playing with a lighter near a Christmas tree, according to a warrant application filed in state court.

Five children were killed in a fire at a day care center in a two-story house in Erie, Pennsylvania. The town’s fire chief said the house only had one smoke detector – in the attic – and had overloaded extension cords under a sofa. The victims were between 9 months and 14 years old and were sleeping upstairs in the two-story house when the fire was reported.

Ten children died when a fire broke out in a building in Chicago’s Little Village neighborhood. The children were attend a slumber party at the time. The building owner has been cited for more than 40 building code violations.

Thirteen people died when a five-alarm fire engulfed an apartment building in the Bronx, New York’s deadliest fire in more than a quarter of a century. The fire started as a 3-year-old boy was playing with the burners of a stove, authorities said at the time.

A hotplate heating up food for the Sabbath started a fire that ravaged the Brooklyn home of an Orthodox Jewish family, killing seven children. There was no smoke detector on the first floor of the house where the fire started or on the second floor where family members were sleeping.

Ten people, including eight children, were killed when a fire swept through a house in Brockway, Pennsylvania, a rural town about 100 miles northeast of Pittsburgh. The victims aged 4 months to 40 years.

A fire on Christmas Eve at a high-rise hotel that had been converted into apartments for the elderly in Johnson City, Tennessee, killed 16 people, including 14 residents. The fire, which broke out in the living room of one of the apartments, left 30 people injured, including 15 firefighters.

A police helicopter dropped a bomb on a townhouse in west Philadelphia where members of the communal and anti-government group MOVE lived, an action the city council apologized for in 2020 after decades of harsh criticism . Eleven people, including five children, were killed and more than 60 neighboring houses were destroyed by the fire.

A man with a long criminal record and history of mental illness intentionally started a fire in an apartment building in Waterbury, Connecticut, after an argument with a niece who lived there. The fire killed 14 people and displaced more than 100 residents. The man was sentenced to two consecutive life sentences for the arson.


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Today in Johnson City History: January 8 | Life https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/today-in-johnson-city-history-january-8-life/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/today-in-johnson-city-history-january-8-life/ 8 January 1845: Michael Clem placed an advertisement for an apprentice in The Jonesborough Whig and Independent Journal. Mr. Clem needed “an apprentice in the tannery business of good and industrious habits.” Contact the subscriber in Jonesborough. January 8, 1874: Herald and Tribune readers were reminded that the newspaper’s offices had moved from Cox’s Row. […]]]>

8 January 1845: Michael Clem placed an advertisement for an apprentice in The Jonesborough Whig and Independent Journal. Mr. Clem needed “an apprentice in the tannery business of good and industrious habits.” Contact the subscriber in Jonesborough.

January 8, 1874: Herald and Tribune readers were reminded that the newspaper’s offices had moved from Cox’s Row. Their new offices were in a building “just east of Dosser ‘Store”.

The Herald and Tribune was a newspaper published in Jonesborough, spelled as such in 1874. It is still published under the same name.

January 8, 1897: One hundred and twenty-five years ago today, the Daily Times reported news with a date from Johnson City. Readers learned that “The shareholders of Watauga (sic) Bank held their seventh annual meeting this morning and elected the directors and officers as follows: Chairman, AB Bowman; vice-president, George D. Taylor; cashier, FB St. John; assistant cashier, WB Harriman; lawyer, Isaac Harr.

The Daily Times was a newspaper published in Chattanooga. It is now published as the Chattanooga Times Free Press. Johnson City did not have a daily newspaper in 1897; The comet was released on a weekly basis.

January 8, 1919: The Johnson City Daily Staff reported: “Friends will be happy to hear that little Miss Virginia Givens is improving slightly from a case of the flu and measles (sic).”

January 8, 1922: One hundred years ago today, The Journal and Tribune reported news with a date from Johnson City. “The Johnson City Council of Realtors held their regular monthly meeting Thursday at noon at the Spinning Wheel (sic) tea room. The meeting was informal and no major business issues were resolved. The officers were elected only a few weeks ago and the charter has been guaranteed. The council now includes twenty-four real estate companies in the city.

The Journal and Tribune was a newspaper published in Knoxville. It ceased publication in 1924. We do not have access to any newspaper published in Johnson City on January 8, 1922.

January 8, 1928: The Knoxville Sunday Journal, with a date from Johnson City, reported news of a shooting here. “Raymond Stroup, 38, was killed instantly, and Deputy Police Chief Tom S. Church, 47, was fatally injured in a pistol duel shortly after midnight today.”

The article went on to read: “Officer Church was responding to a call to arrest Stroup on charges of drunkenness, when Stroup drew a gun and shot Church in the abdomen. Church managed to draw his gun and shot Stroup in the head and chest, killing him instantly. Church was to die before dawn.

The article concluded: “Stroup had been in Johnson City for about six months. Church had been in the police force for six years.

The Knoxville Sunday Journal was published as the Knoxville Journal on the other days of the week. It is now published as the Knoxville News-Sentinel.

January 8, 1942: The Bristol News Bulletin, with a date from Johnson City, reported a “priority clinic”. “The first ‘Priorities Clinic’ held at the Johnson City Chamber of Commerce proved so useful to businessmen and industrialists in that section that a representative of the Priorities Service in the Field, Office of the production management, will be sent to the Johnson City House every Tuesday until later, Dave H. Shearer, speaker of the chamber, announced today.

The article continued to state: “Dyer Butterflied, of Knoxville, director of the Priorities Field Service for that section, who was in Johnson City last Tuesday, said it was evident that a ‘full day of working once a week is not too much time for this section ”, and he promised either to be there every Tuesday or to have a representative.

The Bristol News Bulletin is now known as the Bristol Herald Courier.

January 8, 1947: 75 years ago today, the Johnson City Press-Chronicle reported that “the approval of the Tennessee Education Association’s legislative program and the appointment of committees for the current year featured a Jonesboro Kiwanis Club luncheon. yesterday in the dining room at Jonesboro Methodist Church. “

“Gordon Lyle presented a resolution approving the AME’s legislative program, which was approved unanimously, and a copy was forwarded to Senator Hubert C. Brooks and Representative ME Tipton.”

The Kiwanis Club had a multitude of committees. Some of the various committees included the underprivileged child, career counseling, boys and girls work, sponsored youth organization, agriculture, public affairs, business standards, club and goal support. spirituality, Kiwanis education, achievement reports, finance, laws and regulations, classification, membership, public relations and attendance.

Jonesboro was spelled this way in 1947.

January 8, 1948: The Elizabethton Star reported on the upcoming Lincoln Day reunion. With a date from Johnson City, readers learned: “B. Carroll Reece, Chairman of the Republican National Committee, will broadcast a Lincoln Day speech from Johnson City on a national radio network on February 10,” the Republican President said today. of the County, John C. Smith.

Additional details included: “Smith said that Reece’s speech at an inaugural Congressional District meeting here will be broadcast in Asheville, NC, where it will air on a station in the Columbia Broadcasting System.

The Elizabethton Star is still being published.

January 8, 1955: The Kingsport Times, with a date from Johnson City, reported on an upcoming basketball game. “East Tennessee State College will take their seventh basketball victory of the season on Saturday night at the Memorial Building, and the Bucs could have trouble with the tall, tall David Lipscomb Bisons who have a good height – if not a very glittering record at this. day. “

East Tennessee State College is now known as East Tennessee State University.

The Kingsport Times is now published as the Kingsport Times News.

January 8, 1967: “Pvt. Grover Queen, 19, son of Mr. and Mrs. Grover Queen … East Pine St., serves in the US Army in Germany, ”according to the Johnson City Press-Chronicle.

The article continued to say, “The former Science Hill High School student works with heavy equipment and engineering. Entered military service last July, he was previously stationed at Fort. Leonard Wood, Mo. ”

January 8, 1972: Fifty years ago today, according to the Johnson City Press-Chronicle, “Hal Bullen, director of the National Ruritan Club, recently installed officers for 1972 for the Bowmantown Ruritan Club”.

“Installed to Serve Over the Following Year: Robert Winegar, President; Jimmy Dykes, vice-president; Gary Harris, secretary; and Robert Ward, treasurer.

“David Tydings has been installed for a three-year term as director; CD Williams for a two-year term as director.

“The people to serve as directors for one year included Freddy Squibb, Lawson Broyles, Jack Luster and Bob Bales. “

“New officials were sworn in at the club’s annual ladies night at Daniel Boone High School. “

January 8, 2007: The Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy held its first white coat ceremony. (Source: Personal communication between Dean Emeritus Larry Calhoun and Rebecca Henderson.)


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Today in Johnson City History: January 6 | Life https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/today-in-johnson-city-history-january-6-life/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/today-in-johnson-city-history-january-6-life/ January 6, 1841: The Whig reported news of a recent wedding that had taken place. “Last Tuesday, by the Rev. John W. Cunningham, Dr James Patton, to Miss Sarah Barkley, daughter of Dan’l Barkley, Esq., Of this county.” The Whig was a newspaper published in Jonesborough, spelled as such in 1841. January 6, 1893: The […]]]>

January 6, 1841: The Whig reported news of a recent wedding that had taken place. “Last Tuesday, by the Rev. John W. Cunningham, Dr James Patton, to Miss Sarah Barkley, daughter of Dan’l Barkley, Esq., Of this county.”

The Whig was a newspaper published in Jonesborough, spelled as such in 1841.

January 6, 1893: The Evening Republic reported some interesting news with a date from Johnson City. “Several months ago, a stranger stole a horse from Mr. Charles Baker in Carter County (sic), Tenn. The thief was located in Lenoir, North Carolina, and identified as Lewis Carter. Deputy Sheriff Miller, of Caldwell, chased him and caught up with him about five miles from Lenoir.

“The thief has left for the woods. Miller followed. Carter walked past behind a tree and as Miller passed, opened fire on him with a gun, killing him almost instantly. Carter was captured in Limestone, Tennessee on Tuesday night and taken to Lenoir County Jail, NC. It is unlikely that he will ever live to stand trial for his crime.

Lenoir, North Carolina, is approximately 77 miles from Johnson City.

The Evening Republic was a newspaper published in Columbus, Indiana; it is now published under the title La République.

January 6, 1897: One hundred and twenty-five years ago today, the Herald and Tribune published several interesting stories. Readers learned that “Mayor Britton has been very ill with the flu over the past week. “

“The Chancellery Tribunal met at this location last Monday. Judge John P. Smith on the bench.

“JM Fink, who was confined in the chamber for about a week with the handle, was out yesterday.”

Ms. Mary Epps and the children returned home Friday after a week-long visit to Johnson City.

Finally, readers learned of the existence of a lost cow. “Lost – A cash cow, red sides, white back and face, spotted neck, right hip thrown back; about ten years old and tall. Supposed to have gone towards Johnson City. Any information as to its whereabouts will be gratefully received. Address JJ Simpson, Limestone, Tennessee.

The flu, or grip, is now known as the flu.

The Herald and Tribune was, and still is, a newspaper published in Jonesboro, which was spelled this way on the letterhead in 1897.

January 6, 1910: The Williams Bible class, which was a men’s class at Munsey Memorial Church, recently held an election, according to The Comet. SC Williams was elected teacher and Colonel EC Reeves was elected assistant teacher.

January 6, 1915: The Chattanooga Daily Times, with various dates from Upper East Tennessee, ran several topical articles of interest to the Johnson Citians. From Bristol, Tennessee, readers learned: “A surprise arose Monday in Blountville County Court in Sullivan County (sic), Tennessee, just across from Virginia, when Professor JEL Seneker, who had was superintendent of education in the county for thirty years, was defeated by Craft Akard ”

Jonesboro readers learned: “At a county court meeting in Jonesboro on Monday, JH Epps was re-elected president and Professor ES Depew was named county superintendent of public education for the county for the fourth time. from Washington (sic). “

From Unicoi County, “At the Unicoi County (sic) County Court session on Monday, AEB Jones was elected President and Ms. WA Roberts was re-elected County Superintendent of Public Education.”

Carter County reported: “The county court met in Elizabethton on Monday. EH Little was elected chairman of the county court and Professor Grant Ellis was chosen superintendent of public education.

Jonesboro was spelled this way in 1915.

The Chattanooga Daily Times is now published as the Chat-tanooga Times Free Press.

January 6, 1922: A century ago today, The Journal and Tribune reported baseball news. “Appalachian League Baseball (sic) directors have been called to meet at President WB Ellison’s office in Johnson City on Saturday, Jan. 14.”

“Notices to all clubs in the league have been sent by President Ellison calling for full participation.”

“There are many important issues to be considered at this meeting as this is the first meeting since the end of the season last fall. New officers will be elected, constitutional and constitutional amendments may be made, and methods of enforcing salary and player limits will be discussed and possibly adopted.

“Local fans are eagerly awaiting a decision from authorities in Johnson City, and the receipt of letters here yesterday gave the local sports offices a first impression of the President’s action.”

The Journal and Tribune was a newspaper published in Knoxville.

January 6, 1947: The Elizabethton Star ran an advertisement for Burgie Drug Store. The advertisement stated that Burgie had been in business for 50 years. Their slogan was “Let us fill your prescription where you get the best for less”.

Burgie Drug Store is still in operation in 2022.

The Elizabethton Star is still being published.

January 6, 1972: 50 years ago today, temperature variations made the headlines. According to the Johnson City Press-Chronicle, “most of Tennessee, including parts of the Tri-Cities, were chatting in a cold snap last night that gripped the state following an arctic storm yesterday.”

“A cold snap advisory was issued last night by the National Weather Service, with morning temperatures expected to drop to 10 degrees. Snow showers were to accompany the first intense cold spell of winter in the Upper East Tennessee region.

“A little relief is shown throughout the day with the general forecast calling for clear skies and cold temperatures. The high should struggle against the 20’s low with tonight’s low at 15. “

“Temperatures like this quickly took the heat off yesterday’s 50-degree peak. The Wednesday morning low was 46.

“The trail of snow yesterday brought the total precipitation for the day to 0.59 inches with the total to date for January at 1.65 inches.”

January 6, 1997: Twenty-five years ago today, in an article by Gregg Powers, Johnson City Press readers learned, “Star Trek fans from across the region converged on Freedom Hall on Sunday in search of collectibles. , autographs and pretty much anything associated with shows. , including a glimpse of two of the stars.

The Johnson City Star Trek Celebration, produced by Trek Productions of Connecticut, provided fans with the latest props from the shows and a chance to meet and get autographs from Marina Sirtis, who played advisor Deanna Troi on Star Trek. : The Next Generation, and Chase Masterson, who plays Leeta the Dabo Girl on Deep Space Nine.


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Today in Johnson City History: January 4 | Life https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/today-in-johnson-city-history-january-4-life/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/today-in-johnson-city-history-january-4-life/ January 4, 1867: The East Tennessee Union Flag reminded readers of an important upcoming meeting. “Don’t forget to attend the ConVention (sic) to be held in Jonesboro ‘next Monday, to nominate a candidate for Congress. May every loyal man in the District be present. Come see! Everyone come and defend the flag of your country. […]]]>

January 4, 1867: The East Tennessee Union Flag reminded readers of an important upcoming meeting. “Don’t forget to attend the ConVention (sic) to be held in Jonesboro ‘next Monday, to nominate a candidate for Congress. May every loyal man in the District be present. Come see! Everyone come and defend the flag of your country.

The East Tennessee Union Flag was a newspaper published in Jonesborough, which was spelled this way on the header. However, the town was spelled “Jonesboro” elsewhere in the newspaper.

January 4, 1872: Readers of the Herald and Tribune advised, “Those of our clients who wish to pay off their timber debt are urged to bring it in immediately. “

The Herald and Tribune was, and still is, a Jonesborough newspaper, spelled as follows in 1872,

January 4, 1912: The Comet reported that we would find out who the Tennessee National Committee member would be the following Monday; it would be either Mountcastle or Vertress. “The two gentlemen are in Washington with their friends and are armed with fifty and seventy-five page memoirs respectively.”

January 4, 1919: The Johnson City Daily Staff said: “It has been suggested, and the idea is not a bad one, that our representative be invited to present a bill at the next general assembly, which begins on Monday, providing for a change in the law. city ​​charter.

“Instead of having six men on the board of education, three republicans (sic) and three democrats (sic), allow citizenship to choose three men, elect them to office and pay them a salary for their services, what whatever their policy. . “

“One of the three would be responsible for buildings and grounds, the second would take care of securing teachers and the third would take care of supplies. These are three pearls in a nutshell.

“Three capable men on the board of education working in harmony with an experienced and acceptable superintendent could and could accomplish results with less friction, faster, and saving city taxpayers time and money. . “

“There is no objection in the staff (sic) of the current education council, but in size it is cumbersome, for the reason that as every man is a busy man he cannot attend meetings, cannot attend meetings. cannot sit on committees, thus rejecting all work on one or two men, who are limited in the thought that they will do something that will not meet the approval of other members who cannot be found when they are needed and wanted .

“As the legislature will not meet again for two years, the preposition will have to be accepted or rejected immediately.”

January 4, 1922: One hundred years ago today, with a date from Hartselle, Alabama, the Birmingham News reported, “John A. Mitchell, of Falkville, will be leaving Wednesday for Johnson City, Tenn., To enter the government hospital there.” Mr. Mitchell is an overseas soldier and for the past year has been associated with the drug trade with Dr. JB Elliott. Due to his poor health, he was forced to sell his belongings here.

The public hospital referred to is now known as James H. Quillen VA Medical Center.

The Birmingham News was, and still is, a Birmingham, Alabama newspaper. We do not have access to any newspaper published in Johnson City on January 4, 1922.

January 4, 1924: The San Francisco Examiner, with a date from Johnson City, reported a tragic fire in the nearby town of Greeneville. “A fire that allegedly started at the Hawkins Feed Company, Greenville (sic), Tennessee, around 11 am this evening threatened the city’s business center, according to telephone messages received here. Shortly before midnight, the blaze was out of firefighters’ control, it was said, and threatened an adjacent department store and hardware store.

Greeneville is approximately 31 miles from Johnson City.

The San Francisco Examiner was, and still is, a newspaper published in San Francisco, California.

January 4, 1947: Seventy-five years ago today, the Johnson City Press-Chronicle reported that “a 59-year-old Clinchfield railroad conductor, Charles C. Presley, 316 Wilson ave (sic), had a plaster applied to his right ankle in Appalachian Hospital as a result of a fall from a freight car, attendants said. He was dismissed after treatment.

“Two painful burn emergencies also occupied Appalachian attendants yesterday. They were Vernon Peterson, a 32-year-old cook for a local restaurant, who had sulfonamide ointment applied to his arm and left hand for severe fat burns and Marylyn Bishop, 14 months old, daughter. of JH Bishop, a local auto mechanic, living on route (sic) 5, Jonesboro. The Bishop child was burnt when hot starch was spilled on his chest.

The Appalachian Hospital was a forerunner of Memorial Hospital, which was the forerunner of Johnson City Medical Center.

Jonesboro was spelled this way in 1947.

January 4, 1948: The Courier-Journal, and with a date from Johnson City, reported on a basketball loss at Milligan College. “After trailing 26-18 at halftime, Berea College came from behind to beat the Milligan College Buffaloes 60-55 here tonight.”

Milligan College is now known as Milligan University.

The Courier-Journal was a newspaper published in Louisville, Kentucky. It is now known as the Louisville Courier-Journal.

January 4, 1952: According to the Johnson City Press-Chronicle, the Swingle Hospital reported the following emergencies: “Garland Harrison, 413 Hamilton Street (sic), was treated and fired, who crushed his finger at work; OA Campbell, 1207 Southwest avenue (sic), sprained ankle while walking on a rock; HB Webb, 1108 East Unaka avenue (sic), cut in left eye when falling against furniture in house; Charles Burleson, 313 Wilson avenue (sic), facial burns received while cleaning a bicycle with gasoline; Miss Thelma Eads, Limestone, route (sic) 2, smashed finger in the car door.

Swingle Hospital was a private hospital. It was located near Science Hill.

January 4, 1972: Fifty years ago today, with an Elizabethton deadline, the Johnson City Press-Chronicle reported: “The Carter County Board of Education (sic) is considering the installation of a training of junior reserve officers in county high schools.

The article continued: “The lieutenant. Col. Joe Dumic (retired) who has served as an ROTC instructor at Science Hill High School, Johnson City for the past three years, explained the program to council members here yesterday.

January 4, 1997: Twenty-five years ago today, Press Business editor Phyllis Johnson informed Johnson City Press readers that “Sweet Music may come out of Elks Lodge No. 825 in the near future.”

“The lodge, located at 121 Adams St., is being billed as a new temporary, if not permanent, home for the Johnson City Symphony and Suzuki Music School, two groups currently running out of rehearsal space.”


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museum of natural history lists more than 500 new species in 2021 | Natural History Museum https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/museum-of-natural-history-lists-more-than-500-new-species-in-2021-natural-history-museum/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 00:01:00 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/museum-of-natural-history-lists-more-than-500-new-species-in-2021-natural-history-museum/ Six new dinosaurs, an Indian beetle named after Larry the cat, and dozens of crustaceans essential to the planet’s carbon cycle were among 552 new species identified by scientists at the Natural History Museum this year. In 2021, researchers described previously unknown species through the Tree of Life, of a pair of giant carnivorous dinosaurs […]]]>

Six new dinosaurs, an Indian beetle named after Larry the cat, and dozens of crustaceans essential to the planet’s carbon cycle were among 552 new species identified by scientists at the Natural History Museum this year.

In 2021, researchers described previously unknown species through the Tree of Life, of a pair of giant carnivorous dinosaurs known as spinosaurs – nicknamed the “river hunter” and “hell heron”. – to five new snakes which include Joseph’s runner, who has been identified using a 185-year-old painting.

With international travel to the field sites being limited, scientists at the London Museum focused on describing the existing collections and species that roamed the Earth millions of years ago.

Two newly described spinosaur dinosaur species discovered on the Isle of Wight, named “Hell Heron” and “Bank Hunter”. Photography: Anthony Hutchings

“It’s been a fantastic year for describing new dinosaurs, especially from the UK,” said Dr Susannah Maidment, senior palaeobiology researcher at the museum, who helped describe some of the new findings. “Although we have known about the UK’s dinosaur heritage for over 150 years, the application of new techniques and data from around the world is helping us uncover a hidden diversity of British dinosaurs.”

Spinosaurs were among four species of British dinosaurs described by researchers alongside a new, unusually snouted iguanodontian from the Isle of Wight, and Pendraig milnerae, the oldest known carnivorous dinosaur in the UK.

More than half of the new species identified at the museum this year were copepods, small shrimp-like creatures found in salt and freshwater. They make up a large portion of the zooplankton on which krill, fish and other invertebrates feed, playing a vital role in the ecology and carbon cycle of the planet.

Due to their abundance, copepods are among the oceans’ greatest carbon sinks. Scientists have described 291 species this year, many of which come from a collection created over six decades by French researchers Claude and Françoise Monniot.

“Copepods are not only free, but many are parasites, and they can be found living in virtually every other major group of animals,” said Professor Geoff Boxshall, a researcher in the museum’s department of life sciences. who identified the crustaceans with a South Korean. colleague, Il-Hoi Kim.

“The huge Monniot collection has been made available to Il-Hoi Kim and myself, and since we are both recently retired, we theoretically had time to finally browse it. However, the collection was so huge it was somewhat intimidating – but then Covid-19 came along and the completion of the article series became my lockdown project. “

Impatiens versicolor, a new species of gemweed or touch-me-nots, discovered in East Africa in 2021
Impatiens versicolor, a new species of gemweed or touch-me-not, discovered in East Africa. Photography: Eberhard Fischer

Other newly identified species included 52 wasps, 13 moths, seven crabs, six flies, and five amphipods. Beetles were very present, as they did in 2020, with 90 new species described. They included a pair of purple and green metallic beetles from India, a monochrome beetle with a large pair of Philippine jaws, and a swamp-loving beetle named in honor of Larry the Cat, the Mouse of Downing Street.

A new Southeast Asian bush cricket, known for its song even before the animal was ever seen, was ultimately determined to be a species found in Singapore – now known as Mecopoda simonodoi – a copy of which has been in the museum since 1984.

Five new species of plants from East Africa have been identified: known as Jewelweeds or touch-me-nots, they usually produce delicate pink or white flowers, with the exception of a few species that have moved on to red flowers to attract birds rather than butterflies for pollination.

In addition to plants, eight new species of algae, six parasitic worms and three diatoms – unicellular algae – have been identified.

Find more coverage on the Age of Extinction here and follow the biodiversity journalists Phoebe weston and Patrick greenfield on Twitter for all the latest news and features



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