Living History – Suffolk BRC http://suffolkbrc.org.uk/ Tue, 05 Jul 2022 18:31:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/default-150x150.png Living History – Suffolk BRC http://suffolkbrc.org.uk/ 32 32 D-Day Ohio WWII Museum in Conneaut will hold an open house – News-Herald https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/d-day-ohio-wwii-museum-in-conneaut-will-hold-an-open-house-news-herald/ Tue, 05 Jul 2022 18:31:25 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/d-day-ohio-wwii-museum-in-conneaut-will-hold-an-open-house-news-herald/ The WWII Ohio D-Day Museum in Conneaut has announced that its 2022 Open House featuring The Everley Sisters will take place from noon to 5 p.m. on July 9. The Everley sistersa three-part local harmony trio performing in the style of the Andrews Sisters, is scheduled to perform at 1 and 3 p.m. Two sisters […]]]>

The WWII Ohio D-Day Museum in Conneaut has announced that its 2022 Open House featuring The Everley Sisters will take place from noon to 5 p.m. on July 9.

The Everley sistersa three-part local harmony trio performing in the style of the Andrews Sisters, is scheduled to perform at 1 and 3 p.m. Two sisters and their close friend combined their love of music with their passion for WWII history almost seven years ago and they have performed at numerous public and private events on the East Coast as well as in France as part of the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings, according to a press release.

Additionally, re-enactors scheduled to appear at the open house include US Navy Aviation Metalsmith, US Navy Higgins Boat Crew and German Service Kreigsmarine (U-Boat). Vintage vehicles must be on site for people to examine.

Information about living history involvement as a WWII re-enactor will be available along with information about volunteering at the Museum and the annual D-Day Conneaut WWII re-enactment at Township Park. Known.

Admission is free while donations will be accepted. The D-Day Ohio WWII Museum is housed in the historic 1914 Hungarian Church at 851 Harbor St. in Conneaut.

The museum is regularly open from noon to 5 p.m. on Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, from Memorial Day weekend to Labor Day weekend. Its handicap-accessible first-floor exhibits are updated each year to include the many new gifts that showcase and honor the service of local and regional Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and Airmen, the statement said.

Once again this year, authentic World War II re-enactors, living historians and/or collectors will be present almost every weekend to share their knowledge. On July 16 and 17, there will be a French Resistance encampment, the Maquis de Bretagne.

The museum’s basement has been transformed into a 1940s house that includes a fully equipped kitchen, dining room, sewing corner, living room, bedroom and study/office to show how every aspect of life on the home front was affected by the events of the war.

In his backyard there is a victory garden planted in accordance with wartime government guidelines using heirloom varieties believed to have been found in 1940. This year’s garden has a southwestern theme with tomatillos .

For details, contact ddaymuseum@ddayohio.us.

]]>
17 things to do this week, from July 4 to the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/17-things-to-do-this-week-from-july-4-to-the-pittsburgh-vintage-grand-prix/ Sun, 03 Jul 2022 19:05:56 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/17-things-to-do-this-week-from-july-4-to-the-pittsburgh-vintage-grand-prix/ What’s happening this week in Pittsburgh, July 4-10? Find out here. Visit each organization’s website and social media to change Covid protocols. Do you know of a cool event? Email us. Monday, July 4: Celebrate America at Kennywood11am-11pmThere’s nothing quite like the glow and buzz of Kennywood at dusk. The aura of the park will […]]]>

What’s happening this week in Pittsburgh, July 4-10? Find out here. Visit each organization’s website and social media to change Covid protocols. Do you know of a cool event? Email us.

Monday, July 4: Celebrate America at Kennywood
11am-11pm
There’s nothing quite like the glow and buzz of Kennywood at dusk. The aura of the park will shine even brighter on Independence Day. With extended vacation hours, thrill seekers can ride the iconic rides, watch musical performances and indulge in new food stalls around the lagoon. End your 4th of July fun with fireworks at 10:15 p.m. Remember: Kennywood is now cashless! To buy tickets.

Photo by Jantzen Simko.

Monday, July 4: Fourth at the Fort of the Fort Pitt Museum
1 p.m.-4 p.m.
Before the main attractions of Point State Park, join museum staff, scouts and veterans for a 36-foot garrison flag raising in the courtyard of Fort Pitt Block House – the oldest building in the area. The family free afternoon includes living history demonstrations and activities in partnership with Civic Season and Made By Us, held between June 19 and July 4 each year.

Monday, July 4: Independence Day at 7507 Kelly St.
3 p.m.
The Lutheran Episcopal Alliance and the Church of the Holy Cross are partnering with local organizations to bring this family-centered Independence Day celebration to Homewood. Relax and grill on the church lawn while enjoying live music, food, and a screening of “Black Panther.” Reserve your spot by calling 412-242-3209.

Monday, July 4: Independence Day at Point State Park
4pm-10pm
Build Point State Park your 4th of July HQ with a family picnic, summer soul line dancing, demonstrations, games and more. As evening approaches, catch performances by the East Winds Symphonic Band and the River City Brass. New this year is an immersive performance of Squonk Opera’s “Hand to Hand” featuring giant puppet fingers, rock music and dueling guitars. The night will sizzle when the Zambelli Fireworks the display bursts into the air at 9:35 p.m.


Carnegie Science Center

Photo courtesy of the Carnegie Science Center.

Monday, July 4: Explosive Science! at the Carnegie Science Center
6pm-11pm
Fireworks look spectacular, but what’s behind the sparks and booms? Infuse your patriotism with starry science and get a perfect view of the fireworks. Enjoy four floors of interactive exhibits, high voltage shows and live music by My So Called 90’s Band. The explosive fun includes guaranteed parking, science demonstrations and even a Pittsburgh cookie table. To buy tickets.

Monday, July 4: 4th of July cruise on the Gateway Clipper
6:45 p.m.
If you prefer to watch fireworks from the water, board an iconic large riverboat for an unforgettable fourth. Stroll to the Third Bridge for breathtaking views, glide along the city’s lazy rivers, and enjoy an Independence Day-themed buffet dinner. The captain will share sightseeing anecdotes and DJs from First Class Entertainment will provide the beats. To buy tickets.

Photo courtesy of Allegheny County.

Thursday, July 7: Dog Days of Summer at Boyce Park
6-8 p.m.
The sweltering days of summer have arrived and now local Fidos have a series just for them at Allegheny County Parks. Enjoy a summer evening of fun and free games with your furry best friend, including a puppy pool and treat bags!

Friday, July 8: Michael Macioce: So Far at Fungus Books
5-7 p.m.
Writer Allen Ginsberg. Musician Sun Ra. The artist Christian Marclay. These are just a few of the legendary cultural figures captured on film by a contemporary photographer. Michel Maciocewho has been practicing photography from his East Village studio since 1982. Be the first to see Macioce’s Pittsburgh work in the city’s newest — and smallest — town. library and meet the prolific artist at tonight’s free vernissage. This is a rare opportunity to see images in print and on display for the first time, including Macioce’s work with Beat-era icons, leading Shimmy Disc bands, avant-garde giant John Zorn and Moreover.

Friday, July 8: Mobile beer market and music on Monday at SouthSide Works
5pm-10pm
the nomad beer market run by Beers of the Burgh and the Pittsburgh Brewers Guild is popping up on the South Side to help Music on Monday sink in the summer. The taps will be flowing with beers from five local breweries as musicians Marabelle Skipworth, Julia Capuzzi, The Roof and The Stonethrowers rock the outdoor stage.

Friday July 8: “The Cherry Orchard” at OneValley
8 p.m.
Classic Chekhov staged in a stylish startup space? If anyone can do it, Quantum Theater can. Company founder Karla Boos stars as Madame Ranevskaya in Libby Appel’s acclaimed adaptation of Chekhov’s greatest and final play. Directed by Katie Brook, Boos is joined by the entire Lehane/Klatscher theatrical family — in a Pittsburgh premiere. In a setting built on the banks of the Mon, the public will discover what happens when Ranevskaya “goes away the train from Paris for a return trip to its precious cherry orchard. To buy tickets.


Saturday July 9: Inside Out at the Carnegie Museum of Art
12 p.m.-5 p.m.
Fill your Saturday with free creative experiences in the sculpture courtyard of the CMOA. Museum visitors can dance to Cuban jazz by Hugo Cruz and Caminos and dance on the dance floor with DJ Mary Mack. Carnegie International artist Rafael Domenech will lead hands-on activities, and attendees can grab lunch or dinner at local food trucks.

Saturday July 9: Kinky Boots at the Benedum Center
2 p.m. & 8 p.m.
You have two more nights to witness “the uplifting true story of a struggling shoe factory that will lift your spirits.” Winner of six Tonys, the show features a score by Cyndi Lauper and a book by Harvey Fierstein. Both hilarious and heartfelt, the musical is packed with elaborate costumes, soaring choreography, and a powerful story. You won’t be able to resist dancing in the aisles. To buy tickets.

Saturday July 9: Headspace at Zynka Gallery
5pm-8pm
Head to Sharpsburg to find Headspace. Don’t miss tonight free opening of this must-see exhibition pairing Guyana-born Pittsburgh artist Gavin Benjamin and Dutch-born artist Hans Neleman – “who were once a mentor and protege in New York.” Benjamin’s exhibition program includes three solo exhibitions this fall. One of New York’s leading photographers, Neleman is also acclaimed for his publicity work and videos for bands like The Psychedelic Furs and Toad The Wet Sprocket.

Saturday July 9: Drag ‘N Dance at Moulin 19
6 p.m.-9 p.m.
Drag, dancing and bingo will converge at Hazelwood’s Mill 19 eco-tech center. Play drag queen bingo then dance the night away while enjoying entertainment from Shana Simmons Dance, drag queen Alora Chateaux and DJ Deesus. Proceeds from the outdoor benefit evening will support Shana Simmons’ upcoming dance performance “HYBRID”. To buy tickets.

Saturday, July 9: Marcia Belsky at Bottlerocket Social Hall
7pm-11pm
Pittsburgh’s newest comedy club is actually a retro social hall in Allentown. A highlight of July’s list is comedian and musician Marcia Belsky. Bottlerocket says, “Her song ‘100 Tampons’ about Sally Ride’s journey through space has gone viral during quarantine – but that’s just the tip of the iceberg of her talents.” Belsky has sold out shows in New York and Los Angeles, so don’t miss her in town. To buy tickets.

Sunday, July 10: Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix Kick-Off Rally at Dual Devils Garage
10am-5pm
One of the region’s most distinctive summer events is starting engines in Houston, Pennsylvania. Imagine cool cars, country roads and a treasure hunt all rolled into one. It’s a great way to spend a Sunday and kick off this year’s expanded Grand Prix. The casual event includes a cooking dinner, Rallye rewards, Helltown beers and a car show tour. To buy tickets.

Sunday July 10: Visit of the gardens on the south side
11am-4pm
The South Siders have very green thumbs as evidenced by this tour presented by the South Side Community Council. Stroll through 11 enchanted spaces – from large gardens with water features to tiny pockets of blooming wonders. Pick up your business card at 18th and Carson streets. To buy tickets.

For more things to do, read 13 things to do in Pittsburgh in July, from the Furries to Picklesburgh. For live music, check out Pittsburgh Concerts in July: Our Guide to the 16 Must-See Shows. For family events, check out 10 Fun Pittsburgh Events for Kids in July.


4th of July events in PittsburghThings to do this weekThings to do this weekend

About the Author

]]>
The field of pain and sorrow – https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/the-field-of-pain-and-sorrow/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 20:14:14 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/the-field-of-pain-and-sorrow/ Jefferson weaver Note to my readers: I don’t like reprinting columns, as I consider it a lazy habit. However, people ask me about this one every year. At a time when our country is so divided, I could find plenty to talk about this week. The roots of these divisions have different names and different […]]]>
Jefferson weaver

Note to my readers: I don’t like reprinting columns, as I consider it a lazy habit. However, people ask me about this one every year.

At a time when our country is so divided, I could find plenty to talk about this week. The roots of these divisions have different names and different mores today, but the gardeners who nurtured those roots are much the same – people who benefit from continued conflict when the ordinary American wants to sit down and resolve problems and then move on with our lives. . Unfortunately, the politicians and the powerful are the same, regardless of their place in history.

We have to stop the strife, friends. We’re really not that far from being in a bad place again, and we as Americans are better than that. We can pleasantly disagree, as the saying goes, and vote as we see fit if we want to change things.

The column below is an edited version of the previously published piece of the same name.

Thomas Traylor watched.

Ellis Covert was probably ill.

Ben Weaver probably waited.

As important as Independence Day is to me as an American, I also need to remember the date as a Southerner.

From July 1, 1863, to July 3, 1863, many Americans, both North and South, had other things on their minds than barbecue, fireworks, or the beach, things that many of us will enjoy this week.

According to my research, I had 11 family members who fought or served in the war between the states. I won’t use the other incorrect name for this war, because I’m no lemming, and refuse to go with the prevailing tide when it comes to names, especially when they’re inaccurate.

Of my 11 relatives in the war, at least one, probably two, and maybe three were present when General Robert E. Lee’s army entered Pennsylvania and stopped in a small town to buy shoes.

Thomas Traylor – he was rarely called “Tom”, then “Captain Tom” – was my father’s great-uncle. We have a silver cup that Thomas won as the best shot in the Petersburg Light Infantry Greys, a militia unit he eventually led, for a time, as a regular unit of Virginia Troops. On July 3, Thomas held a staff position. This probably saved his life, as his unit was one of those that crossed the fields in what is now known as Pickett’s Charge.

Thomas came from a wealthy family, and late in life, when my father knew him, “Captain Tom” was a gentleman. From the stories Dad and Aunt Eleanor (his daughter) told me, Captain Tom was the model Southerner. He was tall, blond, polite and charming; he drank a little, but not much, and he was an honest businessman.

He was also – perhaps – the only one in my family at Gettysburg who could read and write. He called the place “a field of pain and sorrow”.

Ellis Covert was probably anything but the classic Southern gentleman. Ellis was a great-uncle, or whatever equivalent of cousin, on my mother’s side of the family. He was from a place along the Chesapeake that had good fishing and solid farms. Ellis was apparently a sickly man; I found several mentions of him on sick lists. Whether he had a nervous stomach or an incredible gift for saving his own skin, private Ellis Covert, fisherman, height 5’4″, single, tended to end up on the sick list before major events like Fredericksburg, the valley countryside, and yes, Gettysburg.

Ben Weaver is one of those parents that all good families in the South like to forget. He, too, had a special skill—that of being able to desert to the enemy, return to another unit in Virginia, and then desert later if the mood suited him. How he was never shot I will never understand.

Ben disappeared from his unit rosters after about March 1963, and another Ben Weaver appeared on a Pennsylvania unit roster in April, according to one of my genealogy-obsessed relatives. Since the Pennsylvania unit was in the same area as the Virginia unit at the time, I have to wonder if the Yankee Ben and the Confederate Ben were the same. The Northern unit was there on July 3, 1863.

I thought of my three ancestors – such a pretentious word, this word ancestor, but correct – and those of thousands of other Americans when I was in Gettysburg a year on July 3. I was a member of a living history group participating in what was billed as the largest ever re-enactment of the Battle of Gettysburg. We arrived in Fairfield, the charming cousin of Gettysburg, just after three in the morning.

We were what are often called “hardcore” re-enactors, so we were dressed in our period uniforms the entire trip, which caused some fun at the restaurants along the way. Fairfield was a quiet town at 3 a.m., so we threw down our blankets and slept in a grassy parking lot. We got a lot of attention when the city woke up and started its day to find us there. We later found out that in 1863 the bodies of wounded soldiers who had died in a nearby house that had been turned into a hospital had been piled up where we slept.

One of our party had never been to Gettysburg National Park, so after a hearty breakfast at a cool restaurant, we headed out to the battlefield, guidebooks in hand, square-toed shoes at the feet.

Three of us had decided to cross the terrain where Pickett’s Charge was taking place. While we couldn’t carry our muskets on the park, there were no rules against other addictions, so we hung up our food bags, blanket rolls, and canteens, and started marching. Paul promised to meet us on the other side, where the exact spot of the so-called “Confederation high tide” is marked with a simple monument.

The guns behind us were silent, but the park was far from silent. Tourists from all over the world visited Gettysburg, as they do every 4th of July, and we were never far from the noise of the cars coming up the Emmitsburg Pike.

We were all in good physical condition and well hydrated; we had driven to the battlefield in a comfortable van after a good breakfast. Then there was the small advantage that no one was shooting at us. The temperature that day was cooler than it was when the men of Pickett and Pettigrew and Armisted and the others walked across the field waiting for Federal gunfire so thick the bullets actually hit each other square flight.

Yet, halfway through the overgrown field, we wondered if we had made a big mistake.

Our flat feet have wobbled in the furrows of the previous year; a stream running through the field was a wonderfully cool place to wash our hands, but it caused a bog that sucked in and stuck and held us back as we struggled. A deer passed in front of us, disturbed from its morning siesta. The tall grass cut our hands and face, and more than once one of us needed the other two to recover from a stumbling fall.

Our canteens were dry before we even reached the stream, but the woolen canvas of our uniforms was soaked with sweat and morning dew. Wool socks are great for dry walking, but they slip and slip and feel nasty after getting soaked.

When we hit the three-quarter mark, Moe, Dean, and I separated; the grass was too thick to see to the sides, but looking ahead I could see I was getting closer to the road.

Moe and Dean exited a few hundred yards from our original destination; I was lucky to be on the right track. They waved and walked towards me, and I paused for a moment to catch my breath.

Far behind me, the line of guns shimmered in the growing heat. Brightly dressed tourists took pictures of smiling children sitting on the old smoke poles, their snouts and vents blocked so they could never speak with authority again.

Ahead of me, on the other side of the now paved road, stood a split rail fence. It was along a similar fence and stone wall that the Confederacy came within yards of changing the course of war and our country; I had to move on.

The steel plates of my heels clicked oddly on the pavement, and my water bottle knocked alone against my hip. I scaled the fence, likely violating federal law in the process, and made my way to a simple square monument barely sticking out of the overgrown grass.

It was here, the scorer said, that a group of stubborn and probably scared Tar Heels was “farthest from Gettysburg.” I leaned over and looked at the marker; even though I am by heritage a Virginian, I am a North Carolina by birth, and I thought I should see something special there.

Unfortunately, I didn’t. It was just a small marker the size of a tombstone. It didn’t even have the eloquent prose so common on many other markers we had visited, the same ones photographed by happy tourists.

I wondered why.

I wondered what had driven men of disparate backgrounds, but a common nation, to fight so hard for what they believed was right, or simply because they loved their comrades. I wondered how many really fought for the right to possess or liberate other human beings, as the history books claim, and how many fought for love of home, as Captain Tom did. , who abhorred slavery.

My eyes filled with tears that morning thinking of those who have come this far, only to be pushed away; I also wept for those who held their post here, repelling an invader.

My buddies teased me when I arrived – I hadn’t noticed the charter bus full of Japanese tourists. They took pictures and laughed and clapped. Many clapped and smiled.

I hadn’t shed any blood in that field, except what I had left on the stalks of sharp grass along the path. I never had to deal with a real bullet during this weekend or any other at Gettysburg and a few dozen other reenactments. I wasn’t hungry and I didn’t need to be thirsty.

I wanted to tease the tourists, but I didn’t know what I was going to tell them.

I couldn’t even tell them they were standing on what to me was sacred ground – a field of pain and sorrow.

]]>
Governor of Justice issues statement on death of American hero and West Virginia native Woody Williams https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/governor-of-justice-issues-statement-on-death-of-american-hero-and-west-virginia-native-woody-williams/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 12:41:14 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/governor-of-justice-issues-statement-on-death-of-american-hero-and-west-virginia-native-woody-williams/ CHARLESTON, West Virginia – Governor Jim Justice today released the following statement after learning of the passing of Hershel “Woody” Williams, the nation’s last surviving World War II Medal of Honor recipient and a native of Quiet Dell, Va. -Western: “I ask all West Virginians to join Cathy and I in praying for […]]]>


CHARLESTON, West Virginia – Governor Jim Justice today released the following statement after learning of the passing of Hershel “Woody” Williams, the nation’s last surviving World War II Medal of Honor recipient and a native of Quiet Dell, Va. -Western:

“I ask all West Virginians to join Cathy and I in praying for Woody, his family, friends, loved ones, and the entire military community of West Virginia and the United States of America. Pray that , though the weight of this loss is profound, we can all take comfort in the fact that Woody’s contributions to our nation have inspired generations, cultivated similar bravery and saved lives.Woody Williams will go down in history as the he was one of the greatest West Virginians who ever lived, and we salute him for all he has given to our state and our nation.

“I have been incredibly fortunate in my life and during my tenure as governor to be able to spend a great deal of time with Woody Williams over the years. Woody was a living legend and embodied to the world what it means to be a West Virginian.

“We are a service state – with one of the highest per capita military enlistment rates in the country – because we are a state where people are willing to risk anything to help their neighbor. We are selfless, courageous and share a sense of duty to our state and our nation. Woody Williams was the shining example of these traits. America is the land of the free and the home of the brave because of the acts of bravery displayed by Woody Williams in the spring of 1945. Stories of his bravery on Iwo Jima have undoubtedly inspired generations of West Virginians to follow the call of duty in defense of our nation and our freedoms.

“But as Woody earned his Medal of Honor fighting on behalf of America in one of the most important battles in the history of civilization as we know it, we must also remember that his service didn’t end when he returned home at the end of that conflict more than three-quarters of a century ago. In the decades since, Woody has used his platform to lead the charge into another battle : an effort to honor America’s Gold Star families – those whose loved ones have paid the ultimate price for defending our freedoms – through his Woody Williams Foundation. Woody has led the construction of 102 Gold Star memorials in the 50 American states to forever honor ordinary Americans who have sacrificed so much.Even though Woody may have disappeared from this Earth, his selfless contributions to our state and our nation will live forever.

“Woody was part of what was undoubtedly the greatest generation that ever lived. The bravery displayed by men like Woody Williams across America and throughout West Virginia will probably never be matched, and we must ensure that their sacrifices will never be forgotten. There are still many World War II veterans in West Virginia, but they will not be with us forever. We should all take this opportunity to reflect on the importance that these veterans have for us. If you know a WWII veteran, thank them, love them, talk to them, listen to their story while they are still with us, it is so important. We must keep their memories alive because when the world was at its darkest hour, they were our shining light.

]]>
July 10 events for kids in Pittsburgh, from fairs to fireworks to concerts https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/july-10-events-for-kids-in-pittsburgh-from-fairs-to-fireworks-to-concerts/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 13:37:49 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/july-10-events-for-kids-in-pittsburgh-from-fairs-to-fireworks-to-concerts/ This article was sponsored by Kidsburgh.orgmedia partner of NEXTpittsburgh. register here for Kidsburgh’s free newsletter filled with local resources and expert advice on raising healthy, thriving children in Southwest PA. You don’t have to look far to find kid-friendly entertainment in July. There are plenty of family events in and around Pittsburgh, including some cool […]]]>

This article was sponsored by Kidsburgh.orgmedia partner of NEXTpittsburgh. register here for Kidsburgh’s free newsletter filled with local resources and expert advice on raising healthy, thriving children in Southwest PA.

You don’t have to look far to find kid-friendly entertainment in July. There are plenty of family events in and around Pittsburgh, including some cool Jurassic events and booming ways to celebrate the 4th of July. Check out what’s on tap:

1. Until July 31, “Puffs”, Pittsburgh CLO

Avid fans of the wizarding boy series know that the Puffs were never mentioned in the books. But the comedy “Puffs”, Now playing at the Greer Cabaret Theater, offers a hilarious argument for their inclusion. Traversing “Seven increasingly turbulent years at a certain school of magic,” the clever story offers insight into three unlikely heroes trying to navigate a somewhat dangerous school for children. “Puffs” is offered in performances that match the audience. Saturday and Sunday mornings are suitable for children, Tickets starting at $27.75.

Photo by Scott Weber.

2. July 1-9: Big Butler Fair, Prospect

The 166e annual Big Butler Fair comes alive with nine days of festivities, including a spectacular fireworks display on July 4. High-octane events include Bull Ride Mania, School Bus Demolition, Antique Tractor Pull, and Giant Car Demolition Derby. Carnival rides and games vie for attention halfway through. Farm animals are a big draw with sheep, draft horses, chickens and cows on display. The little ones will find more interest in the Agricadabra magic show that teaches them about farming, the 4-H Club petting zoo and the Parakeet Encounter aviary. Tickets from $8 (free for children 6 and under).

Photo courtesy of Anthrocon.

3. July 2: Furry Parade and Block Party, Downtown

Anthrocon returns to his favorite city with over 10,000 of the cutest Furries from around the world. Most Anthrocon events take place at the David Lawrence Convention from June 30 to July 3, but it’s great fun to spot adorable Furries in town all weekend long. Kids will love the Furry Parade, which will depart from the convention center at 2 p.m. on July 2. The Fursuit Parade will follow a route to the first-ever Anthrocon Block Party on Penn Avenue between Ninth and Eleventhe streets. The Block Party runs until 9 p.m., leaving plenty of time for glamorous photos and selfies.


Photo courtesy of Oliver Miller Farm.

4. July 3: Freedom Day, Oliver Miller Homestead

Time travel to Freedom Day at Oliver Miller Farm to South Park for an old-fashioned party with period music, bells, gunshots and firecrackers. Amid celebratory activities, the Declaration of Independence will be read at 2:30 p.m. Learn about Oliver Miller’s sons, John and William, who fought in the Revolutionary War with Morgan’s Rangers, snipers who used rifles instead of muskets. Well done “huzzah!” $2 admission. No registration is required.

Photo by Anna-Louise.

5. July 4: Independence Day Celebration and Fireworks, Point State Park

Head toward Point State Park for a full day of family fun that includes games, face painting and soul line dancing. On the patriotic side, the Daughters of the American Revolution and Fort Pitt Museum provide a local take on Independence Day history from 1-4 p.m. with Fourth at the Fort. A flag-raising ceremony kicks off Living History Day activities. Costumed interpreters will reenact life at the time.

Squonk Opera will offer two performances of its inventive and playful “Hand to Hand”. River City Brass Band and East Winds Symphonic Band will add upbeat background music. Bring blankets to spread out on the large lawn for your picnic or sample treats from the on-site food vendors.

The evening concludes at 9:35 p.m. with the city’s official Independence Day fireworks display presented by Zambelli. The 25-minute air show will be accompanied by a soundtrack broadcast on 100.1 FM KDKA. Check full schedule so as not to miss anything.

Image courtesy of Universal.

6. July 9-10: “Jurassic Park” in concert with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Heinz Hall

Introduce your children to symphonic music and the magical quality that film music adds to the cinematic experience. Pittsburgh Symphony will perform John Williams’ score live during an HD screening of “Jurassic Park”. The movies would be boring enough without the dramatic, awe-inspiring music that drives the story forward. Tickets starting at $25 for this wonderful family outing.

Photo courtesy of the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy.

7. July 10: Children’s Day, Schenley Plaza

The July installment of children’s day at Schenley Plaza is scheduled for July 10. The Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy welcomes families for an afternoon of fun in the sun — or in the tent. Kids will love the balloon artist, crafts and interpreters. Moms and dads will love the price: everything is free, including rides on the PNC carousel. No registration necessary — just drop by between 12 p.m. and 4 p.m. — or you can Register in advance.


Photo courtesy of Frick Pittsburgh.

8. July 22: Summer Fridays at The Frick, The Frick Pittsburgh

This month’s interpretation of Summer Fridays at Frick invites families to the campus lawns. Bring blankets and folding chairs to relax in comfort. No More Daisies, a pop/country band, will be playing live music for the party atmosphere. Browse premium food offerings like the Beatnik Sweet Eats and Dessert Truck, PGH Halal Truck, Revival Pasta and Café at the Frick. Children will be taken with creating art and other family-oriented entertainment. Be sure to stop by to see the Romare Bearden: artist as activist and visionary exhibition at the Frick Art Museum, which will be open until 9 p.m.

Photo by Bryan Conley.

9. July 23: Story Saturday, Carnegie Museum of Art

This month Saturday story the program features “Iggy Peck, Architect”, written by Andrea Beaty and illustrated by David Roberts. Iggy has a passion for architecture that began at an early age: “He built churches and chapels out of peaches and apples, and temples out of playdough.” Hearing Iggy’s story is likely to enlighten children about the creative problem solving found in architecture. An artistic activity follows the reading of the book. Designed for ages 12 and under, the program is free with museum admission, but registration is required.

Photo courtesy of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History.

10. July 23: Super Science Saturday: Jurassic Day, Carnegie Museum of Natural History

Dinosaurs continue to bask in the spotlight this summer with zealous fans flocking to the latest Jurassic movie on the big screen. of july Super Science Saturday: Jurassic Day considers real science in prehistoric scenes, while emphasizing the Hollywood counterfeit. The day covers the latest scientific findings of dinosaurs from the Jurassic period. Museum staff will be prepared and ready to answer any questions your children may have. Super Science Saturday, intended for ages 7 to 12, is free with admission to the museum.

BONUS EVENTS:

June 27-July 6: “The Rainbow Fish”, South Park Theater

June 30-July 9: Seussical Jr., Little Lake Theater

July 1, 2, 8, 9: “Robin Hood”, Boyce Park and Hartwood Acres

July 2-31: Tomahawk Toss, Fort Pitt Museum

July 3: Independence Day Celebration, Meadowcroft Rockshelter & Historic Village

July 6: Lake Arthur Tea Time Cruise, Moraine State Park

July 11-20: “The Frog Princess”, South Park Children’s Theater


July 12: Cheer Live 2022, UPMC Events Center at RMU

July 15: Ice Cream Bike Ride, Arsenal Park

July 17: Whiskey Rebellion Day, Oliver Miller Homestead

July 23: Critters Creek, Raccoon Creek State Park

July 24, 30, and 31: Breakfast with the Animals, Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium


Big Butler FairFurry ParadeJuly Events for Kids in PittsburghJurassic Park in ConcertFamily Fun in Pittsburgh in JulyActivities in July

About the Author

]]>
4th of July 2022 Fireworks Near South Brunswick https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/4th-of-july-2022-fireworks-near-south-brunswick/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 04:00:38 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/4th-of-july-2022-fireworks-near-south-brunswick/ SOUTH BRUNSWICK, NJ – Cities and counties across the country are continuing to bring back many of the traditional Independence Day activities that have been canceled or changed over the past two years. The 4th of July is right around the corner, so it’s time to find out what 4th of July fireworks and festivities […]]]>

SOUTH BRUNSWICK, NJ – Cities and counties across the country are continuing to bring back many of the traditional Independence Day activities that have been canceled or changed over the past two years. The 4th of July is right around the corner, so it’s time to find out what 4th of July fireworks and festivities are happening near you in 2022.

We have all the fireworks shows, parades and festivals happening in and around southern Brunswick, so you can start planning now.

Here is what awaits you this July 4th:

What: North Brunswick Youth Sports Festival
Where: Route 1 North by DeVry University
When: July 2, 10 p.m.
On July 2, there will be fireworks to celebrate Independence Day at North Brunswick Youth Sports Festival.

What: 4th of July Fireworks Show
Where: Community Arts Centre, 721 Cranbury Road
When: July 4, from 6 p.m.
Join the township for an evening full of summer fun to celebrate the 4th of July. There will be food trucks, music and children’s entertainment, followed by fireworks. The rainy date is July 5.

What: 4th of July Parade and Fireworks in Milltown
Where: mill town
When: July 4, 12 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Milltown will celebrate the 4th of July with a fishing derby, 5k run, parade, duck race, patriotic housewarming contest, music and a pizza eating contest. Fireworks will be fired at night. Details here.

What: Edison Township 4th of July Fireworks
Where: Papaianni Park
When: July 4, 5: 30 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Don’t miss this year Edison Township 4th of July Fireworks at Papaianni Park. Before the fireworks there will be an Independence Day celebration with lots of music, food and other vendors.

What: 4th of July Jubilee – Swinging 60s in Morven
Where: Morven Museum and Garden, Princeton
When: July 4, 12 p.m. to 3 p.m.
The celebration will feature the Princeton Arts Council offering an American flag activity Jasper Johns, the Princeton Historical Society has a significant 1960s adventure activity in Princeton, there will be live dancing in the gardens with the Luminarium Dance Company and live music from the 1960s and beyond, including the hit “TelStar” with the Green Planet Band. Click here.

What: Independence Day Celebration – Living History Day
Where: Washington Crossing Historical Park,
When: July 4, 12 p.m. to 4 p.m.
To celebrate independence day taking the whole family back in time – back to July 4, 1776. Watch historians demonstrate crafts and see a military encampment from noon to 4 p.m. A highlight of the day will be the reading of the Declaration of Independence at 12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.

Due to pandemic outbreaks, counties or cities may adjust or cancel events at the last minute, so check with organizers. Do you know of other events in the area? Post them on the patch calendar.

]]>
Why Jon Rahm appreciates the history of the Country Club https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/why-jon-rahm-appreciates-the-history-of-the-country-club/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 00:11:00 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/why-jon-rahm-appreciates-the-history-of-the-country-club/ US Open 2022: Why Jon Rahm appreciates the history of the Country Club originally appeared on NBC SportsBoston BROOKLINE, Mass. — Jon Rahm looks like he’s really having fun at the 2022 U.S. Open this week. Not only is the defending champ tied for second at 4-under over 36 holes, he has nothing but good […]]]>

US Open 2022: Why Jon Rahm appreciates the history of the Country Club originally appeared on NBC SportsBoston

BROOKLINE, Mass. — Jon Rahm looks like he’s really having fun at the 2022 U.S. Open this week.

Not only is the defending champ tied for second at 4-under over 36 holes, he has nothing but good things to say about the course at Brookline Country Club.

The Country Club is one of the most famous venues in all of golf. Founded in 1882, it is one of the five founding clubs of the USGA.

Fascinating US Open 2022 standings set the stage for an exciting weekend

Rahm appreciates the history behind some of the sport’s most famous courses, and the Country Club is no different.

“It’s a place where you walk in and you start to hear the stories and you go into the locker room and you see the images and the essence of what happened, that makes it even more special,” Rahm said. after Friday’s second round.

“It’s real living history on this golf course. You step on holes that some greats have had in the past. When you get to 17 and you hear everything that happened on that hole , it’s very, very unique. Yeah, it’s very It’s obviously kind of like going to Augusta or somewhere like Riv, Colonial, courses that have hosted events for a long time and are part of this game. “

Besides the story, Rahm loves the uniqueness of the course and how it suits many different styles of play. Many of the holes also offer a bunch of different ways to play them. It’s a dynamic that makes competing on a course like this all the more fun.

“I think a setup like this or a setup like this last week in Canada or Memorial where you have difficulty managing, it really emphasizes all aspects of the game,” explained Rahm. “Especially on a golf course like this. The more I play it, the more I like it.

“It’s such a unique design where you have options off the tee, and you can really choose what you want, and that’s why you have so many players in the leaderboard who have a bit of a difference in length. you.

“Just because you have holes like 17 where you can be as aggressive or as passive as you want. Holes like #7, very similar chord. #5, #3, you can push it as far or as far as you want and give yourself a chance. That’s what makes it so fun, especially with a US Open setup. And having that length is always going to be an advantage, but it will be neutralized a few times, and it’s really, really fun.”

Rahm has a chance to make his own story this weekend. A victory would make him the third golfer in the past 70 years to win back-to-back US Open titles. One such player, Curtis Strange, won his first consecutive US Open crown at the Country Club in 1988.

]]>
4 mid-level novels about LGBTQIA+ lives through time https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/4-mid-level-novels-about-lgbtqia-lives-through-time/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 22:00:55 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/4-mid-level-novels-about-lgbtqia-lives-through-time/ These four mid-level contemporary and historical fiction titles center on LGBTQIA+ characters who fight to live authentically through time and are a reminder that mantras like “protecting trans children” require both words and actions. June is Pride Month and a time to celebrate, but we must not forget that the rights and safety of the […]]]>

These four mid-level contemporary and historical fiction titles center on LGBTQIA+ characters who fight to live authentically through time and are a reminder that mantras like “protecting trans children” require both words and actions.

June is Pride Month and a time to celebrate, but we must not forget that the rights and safety of the LGBTQIA+ community are under constant attack by discriminatory laws and institutions. These four contemporary and historical fiction titles center on LGBTQIA+ characters who fight to live authentically through time and are important reminders that mantras like “protect trans children”
require both words and deeds.

Key, Janet. Twelfth. 368p. Small, Brown. May 2022. Tr $16.99. ISBN 9780316669313.
4th to 8th grade– It’s June 2015 and 12-year-old Maren isn’t very excited about attending Charlotte Goodman Theater Camp this summer. However, Maren is soon drawn into a mystery involving a series of clues that could lead to the missing diamond ring of Charlotte “Charlie” Goodman, the famed director who allegedly perished in a fire and whose camp is named after. Maren quickly befriends budding filmmaker Theo, and together they begin to unravel the mystery, hoping to find the ring to save the camp, which is in need of funding. The novel deftly tackles serious topics like depression, homophobia, and transphobia. It’s also wonderfully inclusive, as Theo is non-binary and Charlie is gender-nonconforming. Key makes good use of Shakespeare’s twelfth night as the backdrop for his narrative, serving as the camp’s main theatrical production, the basis for clues to the mystery, and the lost film that Charlie was working on before his disappearance. The story includes flashbacks to Charlie in the 1940s and 1950s, interspersed with chapters from Maren, set in June 2015, just weeks before same-sex marriage was legalized. Endnotes feature facts about theater, film, and LGBTQIA+ history as well as information about ways readers can seek help if they’re struggling with depression. VERDICT A gripping mystery with a diverse cast of characters; an insightful exploration of the topics of gender, depression and sexuality; and a satisfactory and complete conclusion. Highly recommended.-Laura J. Giunta

Leali, Michel. Amos Abernathy’s Civil War. 304p. Harper Collins. May 2022. Tr $16.99. ISBN 9780063119864.
5th year superior-A well-written coming-of-age novel that wraps many valuable topics – discrimination, teenage relationships, friendship, the LGBTQIA+ community, and underrepresented history into one wonderful story. Amos, who is white, volunteers as a re-enactor at Living History Park with her best friend, Chloe, who is black. There they meet Ben, who quickly becomes a friend of the duo and a budding romantic interest in Amos. But their relationship faces some challenges, including Ben’s religious family. Amos tells his story from his own perspective interspersed with letters to Albert DJ Cashier, a Civil War soldier who in modern times might have identified as a trans man. Amos discovers Albert while researching LBGTQIA+ Americans throughout history, seeking to portray people like him from the past, and hoping to win the Living History Park exhibit contest. Readers will feel the tension as Amos and his friends struggle against discrimination to complete the project. Leali’s character development is superb. The story begins in the present day, but readers learn of the events of the past year in Amos’s commentary as well as his notes to Albert, which then converge back into the present. While this technique is insightful, the time shifts may prove slightly confusing to some readers. VERDICT All in all, an entertaining and engaging read with varied characters and topics. A necessary addition to any collection looking for heartwarming tales of early crushes and the importance of centering marginalized history.–April crowd

Machias, Jules. Fight + Flight. 400p. HarperCollins/Quill Tree. May 2022. Tr $16.99. ISBN 9780063053946.
5th year superior– Everyone has something to do, and some more than others. Athletic Avery suffers from hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, a painful chronic condition that affects his joints. Sarah suffers from anxiety and experiences panic attacks which she tries to deal with by creating art. They both feel like they’re losing control, Avery of her body and Sarah of her mind. The alternate perspectives of these two well-developed characters allow readers to get a realistic glimpse into the minds of teenagers. Avery is pansexual, has two mothers (including a trans mother), undergoing physical therapy for a shoulder injury that prevents her from riding the bike she loves, and has a bullied, biracial best friend with ADHD named Mason . Sarah is struggling in her basics, has heavy family obligations (having to care for her younger siblings), has an aunt who recently passed away, forcing her cousin/best friend to move out, and has a brother gay in a catholic family. Avery and Sarah are brought together by an active-shooter exercise that the school administration stages as if it were real. As a beautiful friendship builds, deeper feelings develop and Sarah begins to question her religious upbringing. It’s a unique, fast-paced novel with a lot to enjoy. However, this should come with some trigger warnings: chronic and mental illness, school shootings, homophobia, transphobia, racism, bullying, death and loss, to name a few. VERDICT A solid, character-driven choice for libraries that tackles tough topics with skill and nuance.–Claire Covington

Buffer, Phil. Small town pride. 272p. Harper Collins. May 2022. Tr $16.99. ISBN 9780063118782.
5th year superior– In the small town of Barton Springs, OH, Jake is the only openly gay kid, a fact he’s pretty comfortable with – though he’s not sure he likes the huge pride flag that his father hooked. Especially because the mayor across the way doesn’t like lawn signs, protests, and anything that threatens the perfect peace she aspires to build in town. As people begin to take sides, Jake wonders what “pride” really means and if he can fit in in the small town he loves. When the mayor’s cute son agrees to help organize the town’s first pride festival, Jake wonders if he can really be trusted and if pride in this town is possible. This is a timely and relevant novel with references to current events that mid-level readers will connect with. Jake and his friends navigate all the normal triumphs and pitfalls of middle school, while planning a Pride Festival with all the optimism and nerves expected of a group of teenagers. Stamper excels at exemplifying the range of support Jake might expect to find, with some of the hypocritical adults undergoing well-designed character development. Some interactions read like a guide to having tough conversations, but for a book that’s about empowering tweens, that’s not necessarily a bad thing. VERDICT Middle schoolers will be drawn to this story of a child trying to find his place, learning to speak, and understanding what pride really means.–Kristin Brynsvold

]]>
Juneteenth in Rutherford County: Events and Activities in 2022 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/juneteenth-in-rutherford-county-events-and-activities-in-2022/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 02:03:44 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/juneteenth-in-rutherford-county-events-and-activities-in-2022/ The History and Meaning of Juneteenth Explained by the Director of the African American Civil War Museum Frank Smith, director of the African American Civil War Museum, explains the origin of Juneteenth and its journey to becoming a national holiday. Josh Morgan, USA TODAY Juneteenth — which annually commemorates the emancipation of enslaved African Americans […]]]>

to play

Juneteenth — which annually commemorates the emancipation of enslaved African Americans on June 19 — has been observed among black Americans for more than 150 years.

But a local NAACP leader wants it to be a holiday that all Americans celebrate.

“Think of celebrating Juneteenth as a day of freedom, which everyone can come together and celebrate wherever they are,” said Katie Wilson, president of the NAACP, Murfreesboro branch.

Juneteenth dates back to June 19, 1865, when Major General Gordon Granger issued General Order No. 3, informing the community of Galveston, Texas that President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation liberated African-Americans. Americans enslaved in rebel states. It is also known as Freedom Day or Emancipation Day.

Now a holiday observed at the federal level from 2021Juneteenth represents a way of life that was granted to black people through emancipation.

“The slaves were freed and given the opportunity to have the journey of their own lives without looking over their shoulders and having demands made on them,” Wilson explained. “They could be enjoying family, enjoying a job, living on their own and trying to make their family and their community the best life possible.”

If you want to know more, Wilson encourages people to research what Juneteenth means for American history in general.

“Think of everyone when you think of Juneteenth,” Wilson. “Celebrate all that the community does to uplift people and don’t think of it as just another party, but as a day to remember what the past was and you can live for a better tomorrow if we let’s all work together.”

Juneteenth in Murfreesboro

The town of Murfreesboro will host a three-day June 19 celebration, culminating in a festival that has tripled in size this year.

The events will take place at the Bradley Academy Museum and Cultural Center, 415 S. Academy St., a former school for black children that was renovated and reopened as a historic site in 1998.

“We’ve expanded the Saturday celebration to three blocks instead of just one this year,” said Vonchelle Stembridge, facilities coordinator at the Bradley Academy Museum. “We are excited to create a learning experience for the community to share the significance of this holiday and look forward to our community coming out to celebrate Juneteenth.”

►On June 16, there will be an Authors’ Night from 5:30-7:30 p.m. featuring local writers discussing their books and meeting the community. Refreshments will be served.

►Enjoy “Kaleidoscope, a collection of resources for mind, body and soul,” from 4-7 p.m. June 17. Celebrate the emancipation of enslaved African Americans in the former Confederate States of America at this unique event.

►The Juneteenth Festival will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on June 18. The free event will include an outdoor children’s zone, free games and activities, food and craft vendors, performers, living historical re-enactments, live music and dance performances. .

The co-hosts of the music part are Miracle Nelson and Donivous Odom. Performers include Ernest Newsom, Reggie White & Friends, DJ Smooth, Bernard Bell & Band, Cat Choreography, Miles Creed, Tramaine & the 7-Improv Band, Joseph Robles and others.

More events: Dickson and Juneteenth’s “Trailblazers” celebrated on Saturday

Emancipation: Juneteenth is a celebration of freedom from slavery. But that did not mean freedom for all.

Jason McGowan, associate researcher in oral history at Middle Tennessee State University’s Gore Center, will also be on hand to talk with the community about a new project to collect oral histories from African-American residents of Middle Tennessee. McGowan will answer questions and distribute information about the project, which is funded by a new grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

For more information about Juneteenth and Bradley Academy, visit murfreesboroparks.com, or contact Stembridge at 615-962-8773, or vstembridge@murfreesborotn.gov.

Discovery Center

Celebrate Juneteenth with free admission from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 19 at the Discovery Center, 502 SE Broad St. in Murfreesboro.

Celebrate African American history, culture and community through special activities for all ages. Visit explorethedc.org/events/juneteenth2022 to learn more.

Contact reporter Nancy DeGennaro at degennaro@dnj.com. Follow the news of the restaurant by subscribing Good Eats in the ‘Boro (and beyond) on Facebook and follow Murfreesboro eats on TikTok.

]]>
Risk factors for miscarriage among Syrian refugee women living outside of camps in Jordan: results from the Women ASPIRE cross-sectional study – Jordan https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/risk-factors-for-miscarriage-among-syrian-refugee-women-living-outside-of-camps-in-jordan-results-from-the-women-aspire-cross-sectional-study-jordan/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 00:36:06 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/risk-factors-for-miscarriage-among-syrian-refugee-women-living-outside-of-camps-in-jordan-results-from-the-women-aspire-cross-sectional-study-jordan/ Attachments Maysa M. Khadra, Haya H. Suradi, Justin Z. Amarin, Nabila El-Bassel, Neeraj Kaushal, Ruba M. Jaber, Raeda Al-Qutob and Anindita Dasgupta Summary Background: Syrian refugee women face health care disparities and experience worse pregnancy outcomes, including miscarriages. We studied risk factors for miscarriage among Syrian refugee women living outside camps in Jordan to identify […]]]>

Attachments

Maysa M. Khadra, Haya H. Suradi, Justin Z. Amarin, Nabila El-Bassel, Neeraj Kaushal, Ruba M. Jaber, Raeda Al-Qutob and Anindita Dasgupta

Summary

Background: Syrian refugee women face health care disparities and experience worse pregnancy outcomes, including miscarriages. We studied risk factors for miscarriage among Syrian refugee women living outside camps in Jordan to identify targets for interventions.

Methods : We analyzed data from Women ASPIRE, a cross-sectional study of gender-related physical and mental health issues of 507 Syrian refugee women (≥18 years old) living in non-camp settings in Jordan. We recruited women using systematic clinical sampling at four clinics. We limited our analyzes to women who had a history of pregnancy and whose most recent pregnancy was single, occurred in Jordan, and ended in term live birth or miscarriage (N = 307). We grouped the women according to the primary endpoint (term live birth or miscarriage) and compared the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of the two groups. We used Pearson’s χ test or Mann–Whitney U test to obtain unadjusted estimates and multivariate binomial logistic regression to obtain adjusted estimates.

Results: The most recent pregnancies of 262 women (85%) ended in a live birth at term and 45 others (15%) in a miscarriage. Since their stay in Jordan, 11 women (4%) had not received reproductive health services. Of 35 women aged ≥ 35 years, not pregnant and not wishing to have a child (or otherwise), nine (26%) were not using contraception.

Of nine pregnant women aged ≥ 35 years, seven (78%) had not planned pregnancy. The adjusted odds of miscarriage were higher in women who had been diagnosed with thyroid disease (aOR, 5.54; 95% CI, 1.56 to 19.07), had been of advanced maternal age ( ORa, 5.83; 95% CI, 2.02-16.91), and had not received antenatal care (ORa, 36.33; 95% CI, 12.04-129.71). Each additional previous miscarriage predicted an increase in the adjusted odds of miscarriage by a factor of 1.94 (1.22–3.09).

Conclusion : We identified several risk factors for miscarriage among Syrian refugee women living outside camps in Jordan. Risk factors may lend themselves to preconception and prenatal care

]]>