Hunting – Suffolk BRC http://suffolkbrc.org.uk/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 04:37:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/default-150x150.png Hunting – Suffolk BRC http://suffolkbrc.org.uk/ 32 32 Fourth annual treasure hunt playing a leading role in celebrating ‘918 day’ https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/fourth-annual-treasure-hunt-playing-a-leading-role-in-celebrating-918-day/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 03:00:00 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/fourth-annual-treasure-hunt-playing-a-leading-role-in-celebrating-918-day/ Today marks Tulsa’s fourth annual 918 day. The day celebrates the diversity and growth of Tulsa and some Tulsans have celebrated by participating in a citywide scavenger hunt. “We will definitely be one of the best teams,” said Team Admiral Triplets. Meet Abby, Amy and Lacy. They are great friends and together they make up […]]]>

Today marks Tulsa’s fourth annual 918 day.

The day celebrates the diversity and growth of Tulsa and some Tulsans have celebrated by participating in a citywide scavenger hunt.

“We will definitely be one of the best teams,” said Team Admiral Triplets.

Meet Abby, Amy and Lacy.

They are great friends and together they make up Team Admiral Triplets.

They said scavenger hunts were nothing new to them.

“We’re big scavenger hunt nerds. We try to find whatever we can do and it’s a fun way to get out and walk around town and have some fun,” Team Admiral Triplets said.

Amy says she has lived in Tulsa her entire life and days like today remind her of how far the city has come.

“It has been a lot of fun growing up here and watching the city grow. I feel like I grew up with it,” said the team.

The team said it was also an amazing way to find out more about Tulsa.

“Remembering how cool the city is and going to all the little places you don’t go to every day is a big part of it and I think it’s just a lot of fun,” said Team Admiral Triplets.

This is the first time they have participated in the 918-day treasure hunt together. Today, it is therefore about creating lasting memories and traditions.

“We usually stick to things, and you know how to build traditions around things like this,” the team said.

And they said if you saw them scavenger hunt today, well, they probably beat you.

“We’re going to win. You better be careful,” said the team.

The winning team will be announced next week and will walk away with Tulsa-themed prizes.

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Grand Rapids company that created an online hunting tool purchased by a Texas company https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/grand-rapids-company-that-created-an-online-hunting-tool-purchased-by-a-texas-company/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 11:45:00 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/grand-rapids-company-that-created-an-online-hunting-tool-purchased-by-a-texas-company/ GRAND RAPIDS, MI – A Grand Rapids-based tech company that creates online tools for hunters has a new owner. Sportsman Tracker, 400 Ann St. NW, was purchased by Kalkomey, a Texas-based company that describes itself as a provider of online recreational safety education and certifications, according to a press release. Terms of the deal were […]]]>

GRAND RAPIDS, MI – A Grand Rapids-based tech company that creates online tools for hunters has a new owner.

Sportsman Tracker, 400 Ann St. NW, was purchased by Kalkomey, a Texas-based company that describes itself as a provider of online recreational safety education and certifications, according to a press release.

Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Sportsman Tracker was founded in 2015 by Jeff Courter, an avid hunter and tech entrepreneur who lives in Rockford. The company created the HuntWise mobile app, which provides users with weather forecasts, the time of the day when animal activity is highest, maps and more.

Sportsman Tracker has around 20 employees, he said.

Courter said the acquisition made sense because it brings together two complementary companies – one helps hunters get the necessary certifications, and the other helps those same hunters successfully hunt once they’re in the field.

“The reason it works is that you bring them into the sport, whether it’s hunting or boating, and…” he said.

While Sportsman Tracker now has a new owner, the business will remain at its current location and the number of employees will not change either, Courter said.

Kalkomey CEO Gayle Anderson said the purchase of Sportsman Tracker would help his business “expand into a variety of new mediums and integrate their innovative products into our broader content platform.”

“I am blown away by their offerings and their talent, and I am thrilled to connect our teams, who I believe are the best educators, developers and outdoor content creators in the industry,” she said.

Courter said HuntWise was created to provide hunters with “intuitive technology and tools to dramatically increase their chances of successful hunting.”

“While most people see big cities like San Francisco or New York as epicenters of technological innovation, the best tech talent resides right here in western Michigan,” he said.

Courter declined to provide exact numbers, but would say the HuntWise app has been downloaded “millions” of times.

Read more:

Trial delayed for men accused of conspiring to kidnap Whitmer due to massive amounts of evidence

ArtPrize launches in Grand Rapids after two years of absence

Michigan pharmacist accused of filling $ 2 million in fake prescriptions for drug network

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CED Evaluates County’s Withdrawal Options From Late Deer Hunting Over Possible Snowmobile Conflicts | New https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/ced-evaluates-countys-withdrawal-options-from-late-deer-hunting-over-possible-snowmobile-conflicts-new/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 22:05:00 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/ced-evaluates-countys-withdrawal-options-from-late-deer-hunting-over-possible-snowmobile-conflicts-new/ The State Department of Environmental Conservation is proposing a regulation that, if passed, would allow counties to opt out of a new year-end deer hunt, which is expected to take place annually between December 26 and January 1. The so-called “vacation hunt” is an extension of the late muzzleloading archery deer season in the southern […]]]>

The State Department of Environmental Conservation is proposing a regulation that, if passed, would allow counties to opt out of a new year-end deer hunt, which is expected to take place annually between December 26 and January 1.

The so-called “vacation hunt” is an extension of the late muzzleloading archery deer season in the southern New York area.

“The DEC adopted the holiday deer hunt earlier this year, providing hunters with new opportunities to venture out when families and friends are gathered for the holidays and the students are at home during the school holidays.” , said DEC commissioner Basil Seggos. “(The) proposed settlement responds to concerns expressed by some local leaders about a vacation hunt interfering with snowmobiling opportunities in their communities. “

Seggos said snowmobiling and small game hunting have safely coexisted for decades, and he encouraged all interested stakeholders to share their comments on the proposed regulation that would allow counties to opt out of vacation hunting before the deadline of November 14.

CED encourages counties to work with snowmobile organizations, landowners and hunters to “share the snow”. The proposed regulation was designed to address concerns raised in some communities that landowners may choose to prevent snowmobile access to trail systems that cross private land during late deer hunting, limiting access by snowmobiles. snowmobiles during the last week of December.

Historically, snow cover deep enough to allow snowmobiling in western New York State is only present occasionally – and in some places – in the southern area during the holiday season.

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If the proposed regulation is passed, counties in the southern zone that choose to block late hunting must pass a local law each year specifying the exclusion from December 26 to January 31. 1 part of the late season of the arc and muzzle magazine.

For this year, counties that pass such a local law will have to send a copy of their passed law to the DEC by December 25. In future years, counties that withdraw are required to send a copy of their enacted law to the DEC by May 1 of each year to allow publication in the DEC’s annual hunting and trapping regulations booklet.

Counties that do not wish to opt out do not need to take such action. Details of the proposal are published in the Sept. 15 issue of the NYS Register and on the DEC website.

Earlier this year, lawmakers in Cattaraugus and Allegany counties approved a pilot law that allows 12 and 13 year olds to hunt deer and bear under the supervision of experienced hunters, but concerns about the hunt deer at the end of the season were not raised. .

Public comments on the late harvest withdrawal proposal can be submitted by email to WildlifeRegs@dec.ny.gov or in writing to: Wildlife Regulations, NYSDEC Bureau of Wildlife, 625 Broadway, 5th Floor, Albany, NY 12233 -4754.

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Sheep hunter rescued after being stranded on steep terrain in the Knik River valley https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/sheep-hunter-rescued-after-being-stranded-on-steep-terrain-in-the-knik-river-valley/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 22:23:23 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/sheep-hunter-rescued-after-being-stranded-on-steep-terrain-in-the-knik-river-valley/ Through Daily News from Anchorage Updated: 1 hour ago Posted: 1 hour ago An Alaska National Guard helicopter crew rescued a fighter on Wednesday after it became stranded in unstable and steep terrain at high altitudes in the Knik River Valley near Cottonwood Creek, a the Guard said in a statement. A man chasing sheep […]]]>
Through Daily News from Anchorage

Updated: 1 hour ago Posted: 1 hour ago

An Alaska National Guard helicopter crew rescued a fighter on Wednesday after it became stranded in unstable and steep terrain at high altitudes in the Knik River Valley near Cottonwood Creek, a the Guard said in a statement.

A man chasing sheep ran aground on a 3-by-3-foot ledge on a 40- to 50-degree slope, and was unable to walk up or down the field, the guard said. He was stuck in the snow, the Alaska State Troopers said in an online report.

The hunter activated an SOS using an inReach satellite communications device, according to the Guard. The soldiers said they were informed of the alert at 1:25 p.m.

The Soldiers then enlisted the help of the Alaska Rescue Coordination Center at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson.

A UH-60L Black Hawk medevac helicopter left JBER with a rescue team around 3:30 p.m. and was directed to the man’s location by Alaska Air National Guard rescue controllers, according to the Guard.

The hunter was at an altitude of 5,500 feet when he was hoisted by the medical evacuation crew, the guard said.

In the statement, Master Sgt. and paramedic Damion Minchaca said the helicopter made two passes over the location before spotting the hunter. The crew did not see him at first because of his camouflaged hunting gear.

“He used quick thinking, turning over his camouflage jacket to point out us with the bright orange color of the fleece on the inside,” said Minchaca, with Detachment 2, G Company, 2nd Battalion, 211th Aviation Regiment. .

The ledge was so small there wasn’t enough room for him and the hunter, Minchaca said.

The hunter was fitted with an aviation life jacket and hoisted into the helicopter, and they flew to Palmer Airport, according to the guard.

The man refused medical treatment or an assessment, soldiers said.

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Mariners drop to four games in wildcard chase after terrible 10th inning against Red Sox https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/mariners-drop-to-four-games-in-wildcard-chase-after-terrible-10th-inning-against-red-sox/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 00:24:28 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/mariners-drop-to-four-games-in-wildcard-chase-after-terrible-10th-inning-against-red-sox/ A slider out of the seam of Jake Bauers pant leg put the potential winning run on base and the possible double winner – a line down the straight field line with Bauers running – landed for a foul of a few. centimeters, transforming screams of hope Mariners fans in the crowd of 17,860 let […]]]>

A slider out of the seam of Jake Bauers pant leg put the potential winning run on base and the possible double winner – a line down the straight field line with Bauers running – landed for a foul of a few. centimeters, transforming screams of hope Mariners fans in the crowd of 17,860 let out bewildered whines.

Instead of a ninth inning victory and a success story for Jarred Kelenic, who went from a hard-hitting messiah to a potential social media outcast in an eventful first season, the young rookie struck an unexpected change. Adam Ottavino – only the second he’s thrown in over 1,000 throws this season – to complete the ninth inning.

And those inches that separated the Mariners from a victory celebration and having to play extra innings were as close as they came to beating the Red Sox in what would instead be a crushing 9-4 loss that would have also torpedoed their playoff hopes.

A 10e-a set implosion that started with a single bloop to the left, a passed ball allowing the starting point to score, a walk and another single bloop without an out being recorded snowballed into a flurry of six points by Boston, turning a 3-3 game into a disappointing rout that pushed fans out before the third out was made.

The Mariners are down to 78-68 and have four games behind the Red Sox (83-65) and Blue Jays (82-64) for second place wild card with 16 games remaining in the season. The Yankees also have half a game ahead of them.

“In a game like this you need a few breaks,” manager Scott Servais said. “You need a bounce off a ball to be fair when it’s barely a foul, things like that. And obviously, we didn’t make it happen for us in the end. Our guys really left everything on the pitch. If Kelenic’s ball is one foot the other way, it’s a win on foot and you may feel better, but that didn’t happen today.

Kelenic, who had two hits earlier in the game, threw a 96 mph fastball from Ottavino on a 0-1 count and sprinted to first base thinking the game was won.

“I was hoping,” Kelenic said softly. “I had a good shot and put a good swing on it, I hit really hard, but that’s what it is.”

Down 0-2, Kelenic didn’t chase three shots out of the area, then fouled on a fastball. Ottavino then stunned Kelenic with just the second change he threw all season for a decisive three strike.

“He kicked off his change like 3% of the time,” Kelenic said, referring to stats from the past few seasons. “I was one of those 3 percent. It’s frustrating. It’s just another learning opportunity – as horrible as it sounds and as cliché as it sounds. I really wish I could have gone up there.

Servais thinks that will prepare Kelenic for the next time he finds himself in this situation.

“The change he threw it in to end the at-bat was one hell of a throw,” Servais said. “It’s above the plate. It’s broken down, and it’s hard to fire. (Ottavino) has a lot of experience, and he’s been through wars a bit. So he has the ability to throw or he wouldn’t be there. It is certainly not his preferred pitch. But it was the right pitch at the time. He kind of had Jarred with the breaking balls and the fastball, and he went down midfield so to speak and it worked for him.

With Drew Steckenrider unavailable due to use and Casey Sadler, Paul Sewald and Diego Castillo used to reach ninth, Servais turned to right-hander Erik Swanson to start on 10e. He never recorded an out and was charged with four runs (three earned) on two hits.

Without an out and goals loaded, Justus Sheffield tried to put a tourniquet on the sleeve. He got Rafael Devers to hit a ground ball against Ty France which resulted in a home strength. But JD Martinez’s ground shot on the left side was just out of reach of a JP Crawford dive. If it had been 6 inches to the right, it’s a double play at the end of the inning and a one-point deficit. Instead, it opened the floodgates for a lead Seattle had no chance to overcome.

Seattle got a strong start from Marco Gonzales despite three runs in the first two innings.

After giving up a solo homerun to Hunter Renfroe in the first, the Red Sox pushed the lead to 3-0 in the second, although a poorly played ball in left field by Jake Fraley could have limited the damage.

It was the second game in a row where a play on a catchable ball in the outfield was not made, leading to runs.

But if there were any thoughts that Gonzales might let the game get out of hand, he immediately quelled that idea in the third inning, removing Renfroe, Xander Bogaerts and Rafael Devers in order. It was the start of four straight scoreless innings where Gonzales failed to allow a hit, fielding a runner and striking out seven.

On his 110e field of the day, Gonzales retired Martinez at bat.

He finished with six innings pitched, three runs allowed on three hits with two walks and seven strikeouts.

“The first run was a mistake for Renfroe, and he took advantage of it,” said Gonzales. “After that, I really don’t think they put in much, not a ton of hard contact. We came in with a great game plan, we executed it.

His teammates also responded with immediate support late in the third against Red Sox starter Tanner Houck.

A start single from Kelenic followed by a single to the right for Tom Murphy resulted in a run. Kelenic tested Renfroe’s powerful but not always precise throwing arm in right field going from first to third. The ball ended up in the camera close to the canoe, allowing Kelenic to score.

Later, with two outs and runners in the second and third, Kyle Seager hit a double in the third baseline to tie the game at 3-3.

Going into the onset of the plaque, Seager had only one stroke – oscillating decay – in 21 plaque appearances on the homestand.

THE SCORE OF THE BOX

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Idaho says tribe not covered by 150-year-old hunting treaty https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/idaho-says-tribe-not-covered-by-150-year-old-hunting-treaty/ Mon, 13 Sep 2021 19:40:00 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/idaho-says-tribe-not-covered-by-150-year-old-hunting-treaty/ By Morgan Conley (September 13, 2021, 3:40 p.m. EDT) – Idaho continued to press its candidacy on Friday for a federal judge to dismiss the North Band’s hunting and fishing rights lawsuit. west of the Shoshone Nation, arguing that the tribe is falsely seeking to graft onto the treaty rights of other tribes established under […]]]>
By Morgan Conley (September 13, 2021, 3:40 p.m. EDT) – Idaho continued to press its candidacy on Friday for a federal judge to dismiss the North Band’s hunting and fishing rights lawsuit. west of the Shoshone Nation, arguing that the tribe is falsely seeking to graft onto the treaty rights of other tribes established under a 150-year-old treaty.

The state and its Department of Fisheries and Game told an Idaho federal court in a memorandum in support of its motion to dismiss that the Northwestern Band was not among the tribes whose rights off-reserve hunting grounds are protected by an 1868 treaty. The state specifically refuted the tribe’s argument that the rights of other tribes would not be diminished if …

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MNR Releases 2021 Deer Hunting Snapshot https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/mnr-releases-2021-deer-hunting-snapshot/ Wed, 08 Sep 2021 23:52:31 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/mnr-releases-2021-deer-hunting-snapshot/ September 8, 2021 The Michigan Department of Natural Resources released its annual snapshot of deer hunting just before deer hunting seasons, which begin on September 11. Overall, conditions look great for the seasons to come, and deer hunters can expect the hunt to be as good or better. than last year. Hunters who have viewed […]]]>

September 8, 2021

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources released its annual snapshot of deer hunting just before deer hunting seasons, which begin on September 11. Overall, conditions look great for the seasons to come, and deer hunters can expect the hunt to be as good or better. than last year.

Hunters who have viewed the Hunting Digest 2021 may have noticed a few regulatory changes in place this year, including an antlerless universal license that can be used in deer management units in most states. Some DMUs in the northern Upper Peninsula are closed to antlerless deer hunting, and two UP DMUs, 351 and 352, require an access permit as well as the universal antlerless permit. See pages 60 and 61 of Hunting Digest 2021 for more details.

“These regulatory changes reflect the evolution of deer hunting in Michigan,” said Chad Stewart, DNR Deer and Elk program specialist. “The last 20 years have seen a dramatic and sustained decline in the number of hunters. Combined with an abundant and resilient deer herd that continues to grow and the added challenge of managing deer disease, a change that represented this shifting dynamic was needed.

Regional perspectives follow. The full 2021 deer hunt preview is available at Michigan.gov/Deer.

Upper peninsula

The past year has been difficult for UP deer hunters, with an overall harvest down nearly 6% from 2019 and a male harvest down almost 11%. While harvest numbers were not as low as those seen in 2014-2016 after the harsh winters of 2013-2015, they are down from the harvest numbers for 2017 and 2018.

Winter 2020 UP was much milder than normal, which was a welcome respite for the deer population. The rapid spring greening allowed many adult deer to recover quickly from the winter tolls. With a bountiful production of masts (nuts, seeds, and fruit) in the fall of 2020, the deer headed for winter in general good shape. Population trends appear to be on the rise this year for the UP

The production of masts this year appears to be very uneven. Look for areas with acorn-producing oak trees, as they will definitely attract deer. The dollar count seems to be improving, but there are still areas where persistence will be required to be successful. Overall calf production looks good. With the new changes to take antlerless deer in the lower two-thirds of the peninsula, hunters have an increased opportunity to fill their freezers for what is hopefully another mild winter to come.

The DNR remains focused on chronic wasting disease surveillance in southern Dickinson County following the detection of the first CWD case on the Upper Peninsula in 2018. For hunters interested in having their deer tested, check out the “tab” For Hunters “on Michigan.gov / CWD to view the map of the priority area in the UP

Northern Lower Peninsula

During the 2020 hunting season, the northern Lower Peninsula saw an estimated harvest of 135,906 deer, an increase of 7% from 2019. While the harvest of males declined by around 5%, From 68,168 in 2019 to 64,725 last year, the woodless harvest increased by 21%. with over 12,000 additional antlerless deer captured in 2020 compared to 2019.

Winter 2020 did not appear to have a detrimental effect on the deer herd in this region due to fewer periods of extreme cold and an overall shorter winter. Another important factor that ensured winter survival was forest management practices (new growth of saplings and crowns of harvested trees) which provided plenty of graze for deer throughout the winter.

The mast harvest in the northern Lower Peninsula looks good this year, except in areas that have been affected by gypsy moth infestations. These regions should not see much in terms of acorn production. Elsewhere, acorns and soft masts, including apples on old farm sites, blackberries and hawthorns all produce well.

Deer numbers appear to be very good in many places, although it is important to note that deer are not distributed evenly across the landscape and some areas may have fewer deer than others. Overall, MNR staff are seeing good calf production this year, with many twins lagging behind.

The spring and summer rains seemed to provide optimal fodder for the deer, and the males turned this into a nice antler growth. There are reports of people seeing better males than in recent years – something hunters may start to get excited about. In some places there is still a long way to go to balance the male / female ratio, so hunters are encouraged to take advantage of new regulations that allow antlerless deer to be taken on the deer license and / or deer combined during a gun. and the muzzleloading seasons.

Surveillance of bovine tuberculosis is still a priority in the north of the Lower Peninsula, with tests carried out in the main counties of Alcona, Alpena, Montmorency and Oscoda, but also in all the surrounding counties (Cheboygan, Crawford, Iosco, Ogemaw, Otsego, Presque Isle and Roscommon). Tuberculosis is a significant threat to the livestock industry, and hunters who wish to do their part to help with surveillance can have their deer tested at any checkpoint this year.

Southern Lower Peninsula

2020 has been quite a year in the southern Lower Peninsula, with an antlerless harvest increasing by 29% from 2019. The male harvest has also increased by over 12%, and – including deer slaughtered by deer management assistance permits – nearly 250,000 deer have been captured in this region. alone. Much of this pressure on antlerless deer has been necessary, as their numbers in much of the region have been steadily increasing for years.

With winter rarely being a factor of population-level impact on the southern Lower Peninsula deer herd, MNR relies on hunters for the bulk of deer management in this region, and recent changes regulations appear to be a step in the desired direction for deer management.

Soft mast harvests appear poor this year, possibly due to drought conditions in June and heavy rains in July. While there does not appear to be a bumper crop of acorns in the area this year, some oak trees do produce, and for those who live in an area with acorns, it is sure to be a magnet for deer early in the year. autumn.

The agricultural fields being efficient, the deer certainly did not go hungry this summer. Corn’s progress is on par with 2020 and above the five-year average, so hopefully many fields will be picked by the gun opener which should lead to continued success this season.

The number of deer seems consistent with that of previous years and, as always, beautiful males were seen. The fawns observed are well developed and on their way to entering the winter strong and healthy.

It is important to note that surveillance for chronic wasting disease is ongoing in the southernmost counties of the Lower Peninsula. Hunters are encouraged to visit checkpoints and test their deer. A complete list of checkpoints is available at Michigan.gov/DeerCheck.

For more information on 2021 deer hunting regulations, visit Michigan.gov/Deer or see the 2021 Hunting Digest.

The MRN wishes all hunters a safe and enjoyable season.

Note to editors: An accompanying photo is available for download below. Legend information follows.

White-tailed Deer: The deer hunting seasons begin on September 11. Overall, conditions are shaping up to be excellent for the coming seasons and deer hunters can expect hunting conditions to be as good or better than last year.

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Comet and asteroid hunter Carolyn Shoemaker dies at 92 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/comet-and-asteroid-hunter-carolyn-shoemaker-dies-at-92/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 18:59:55 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/comet-and-asteroid-hunter-carolyn-shoemaker-dies-at-92/ Carolyn Shoemaker, who for more than a decade managed a telescopic camera with her husband from a high altitude observatory in California and became widely regarded, without academic training, as the world’s first comet and asteroid detector, is died Aug. 13 at a hospital in Flagstaff, Arizona. She was 92 years old. His daughter Linda […]]]>

Carolyn Shoemaker, who for more than a decade managed a telescopic camera with her husband from a high altitude observatory in California and became widely regarded, without academic training, as the world’s first comet and asteroid detector, is died Aug. 13 at a hospital in Flagstaff, Arizona. She was 92 years old.

His daughter Linda Salazar, who confirmed the death, said her health deteriorated after falling a week earlier.

Ms Shoemaker’s career as a professional stargazer began around the age of 50, after Ms Salazar, her youngest child, left for college. To fill the gap, Ms. Shoemaker sought out a “strong and compelling interest,” she wrote in an autobiographical essay.

Although she feels nervous about scientific instruments as simple as a calculator, she has offered to help her husband, revered planetary geologist Eugene Shoemaker, with a project to collect data on comets and asteroids.

Dr Shoemaker believed that comet collisions with Earth were responsible for transporting water and other elements necessary for life to the planet, meaning that humans “can really be made of comet ‘stuff’. Ms. Shoemaker wrote in her essay. Dr Shoemaker was also concerned that a comet hitting Earth could threaten human civilization. Yet relatively little scientific attention had been paid to the frequency and effects of cometary collisions with planets.

At the start of the dark phase of the lunar cycle, making it easier to see faint objects in space, shoemakers traveled to an observatory on Palomar Mountain, near San Diego. To locate previously unknown comets and asteroids, they aimed to photograph the night sky as much as possible. Birdsong signaled bedtime.

In the afternoon, Dr. Shoemaker would take the film they had used the night before and develop it in a darkroom, then give the negatives to Ms. Shoemaker. Using a stereoscope, she compared the exposures of the same block of sky at different times. If something moved against the relatively fixed background of the stars, it would appear to be floating in the eyepiece of the viewing device.

Ms. Shoemaker was tasked with discerning what the grain of the film was (and possibly dust on it) and what was an actual image of light emitted by an object rushing through space. “Over time,” she wrote, “I saw increasingly faint objects.”

It took her a few years to find her first new comet, in 1983. By 1994, she had discovered, in addition to hundreds of asteroids, 32 comets, a number considered by the United States Geological Survey and others to represent the world record on time.

That year was also the occasion of such an exceptional discovery that it inspired what was probably the only time in her life when Mrs. Shoemaker drank champagne straight from the bottle.

A comet, known as Shoemaker-Levy 9 (named after their associate David Levy), stood out from the rest. Rather than take a solitary journey through the cosmic void, Shoemaker-Levy 9 was on a collision course with Jupiter. By detecting the comet shortly before impact, Ms Shoemaker gave scientists the opportunity to examine whether or not comets crashing into planets represented major astronomical events – and to test hypotheses from her work. husband.

The result had all the drama the shoemakers could have imagined: swirling fireballs, a plume of hot gas as high as 360 Mount Everests, and a series of massive injuries that appeared in Jupiter’s atmosphere. . Hobbyist astronomers could see much of it with store-bought telescopes.

The anticipation of Shoemaker-Levy 9 and the spectacular spectacle it produced made the front pages of the New York Times and the cover of Time magazine, which called the Shoemakers “a husband-and-wife science duo who spends their evenings scrutinizing. the sky in search of paradise. intruders. ”The couple and Mr. Levy were featured in a Person of the Week segment on the nighttime ABC News show and met with President Bill Clinton and Vice President Al Gore.

“It definitely showed that comet impact could play a role in shaping the solar system,” Priyamvada Natarajan, professor of astronomy at Yale, said in a telephone interview. “It is a key part of the puzzle of the origins of chemical compounds and of life.”

The event also demonstrated the value of Ms. Shoemaker’s expertise in detecting comets.

“Carolyn Shoemaker is one of the most revered and respected astronomers in history,” Jennifer Wiseman, senior scientist overseeing the Hubble Space Telescope, said by phone. “Her discoveries, her tenacious care in the way she worked – these things created a legacy and a reputation that inspired the people who came to the field after her.”

Carolyn Jean Spellmann was born June 24, 1929 in Gallup, New Mexico. She grew up in Chico, California, where her father, Leonard, and mother, Hazel (Arthur) Spellmann, operated a chicken farm.

She received an MA in History and Political Science from Chico State University (now known as California State University, Chico). She met Eugene Shoemaker at her brother’s wedding, where Dr Shoemaker, her brother’s former roommate at college, was a witness. They married in 1951, a year later.

Ms Shoemaker briefly worked as a teacher after college, but by the time she got married she had quit working. She accompanied her husband on field trips, prepared meals for him and his colleagues, and raised the family’s three children.

Today, professional astronomers use remote-controlled telescopes and digital detection software. They tend not to spend sleepless nights in remote mountainous areas, guiding telescopes across the night sky and developing films in their own darkrooms, as shoemakers did. Yet scientists still depend on the methods Ms. Shoemaker perfected.

“She and her colleagues set the stage to identify what we would call minor bodies in our solar system, such as comets and asteroids,” said Dr Wiseman. “We still use the technique of looking for the relatively fast transverse motions of comets and asteroids in our own solar system, relative to the slower or more fixed position of the stars.”

In addition to Ms. Salazar, Ms. Shoemaker is survived by another daughter, Christine Abanto; one son, Patrick; three grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

In 1997, she and Dr Shoemaker were on a trip to Australia to investigate craters when, driving on a remote backcountry road, they took a turn and collided with an oncoming car. Ms. Shoemaker tore her rotator cuff and broke her rib and wrist. Dr Shoemaker died instantly.

After her husband’s death, Mrs. Shoemaker devoted herself to completing the research they had started.

“Without Gene, I would never have known the excitement of planetary science,” she writes in her autobiographical essay. “Without me,” he often said, “his search for asteroids and comets, and then the work of creating Australian craters, would never have been attempted. Together we could do more than each of us alone.

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Washington postpones wood grouse hunting season https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/washington-postpones-wood-grouse-hunting-season/ Thu, 02 Sep 2021 03:43:36 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/washington-postpones-wood-grouse-hunting-season/ September 1, 2021 8:38 PM Posted: September 1, 2021 8:38 PM Washington Wood Grouse Hunting SeasonCredit: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife SPOKANE, Wash.– Watch out, wood grouse hunters, this year’s season is delayed in Washington. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife said that instead of starting on September 1 as usual, it will […]]]>
Washington Wood Grouse Hunting Season
Credit: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

SPOKANE, Wash.– Watch out, wood grouse hunters, this year’s season is delayed in Washington.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife said that instead of starting on September 1 as usual, it will open on September 15. The good news is that the season will be extended until January 15, 2022, instead of ending on December 31. The best news is that by pushing back the end date, another day has been added to the season.

The reason for the change of season is to reduce the harvest of breeding-age hens, which will ultimately increase the availability of wood grouse for hunters in the future. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife said statistics show that over the past 40 years there has been a decline in the number of forest grouse harvested. One of the most significant impacts on the bird population is that early season hunting in the first half of September exposes breeding females to a higher risk of harvest.

Washington is home to four species of wood grouse, with at least one species in each county.

You can read more about the forest grouse hunting season changes here.


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Nate Kennedy: Small game hunting is a great introduction | Sports https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/nate-kennedy-small-game-hunting-is-a-great-introduction-sports/ Sat, 28 Aug 2021 23:30:00 +0000 https://suffolkbrc.org.uk/nate-kennedy-small-game-hunting-is-a-great-introduction-sports/ Small game hunting is a great introduction to the outdoors. Provided Nate Kennedy special for the citizen It’s exciting to see new people take their chances and try their hand at hunting and fishing. You won’t find me complaining about overcrowded public lands or new hunters who might think differently, look different, or act differently […]]]>





Small game hunting is a great introduction to the outdoors.


Provided


Nate Kennedy special for the citizen

It’s exciting to see new people take their chances and try their hand at hunting and fishing. You won’t find me complaining about overcrowded public lands or new hunters who might think differently, look different, or act differently than me. The hunt needs ambassadors, and I’m glad to see the community grow!

The experience of growing up as a hunter, with a mom, a dad and, finally, the whole family that hunted, was a real privilege. Going from BB gun to .22, .410 and above the chain felt natural, as did starting with squirrels and rabbits, then moving to grouse and waterfowl, and finally big game. As a witness to many hunters getting involved at an older age these days, it’s fun to see what community ramifications they are drawn to first. It’s often turkeys and deer, I get the impression. Especially in New York. These species seem to be a big “in” in this whole hunting story, and it’s easy to see why.

Having said that, I think the old “work up” approach could be overlooked. While I think you should get your teeth into the species that appeals to you the most, starting with the small game gives the hunter a chance to have a blast, and it’s an amazing way to start learning the wood and get to know yourself as a hunter.

Whether it’s your first hunting season or not, there are plenty of reasons to try small game hunting this fall.

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